Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Erythroneura festivaA boldly marked species with a strongly developed reddish-orange and bluish-gray color pattern on the wings and body. The top of the head has two reddish-orange parallel submedial lines on either side of a pale midline; the lines have prominent lateral branchesthat encapsulate pale spots. The pronotum has an "M" shaped reddish mark on an otherwise bluish-gray background. The mesonotum is pale with red lateral triangles. The underside of the thorax is dark, and the anteclypeus is a dark brown color, a key characteristic of this species which contrasts with the mostly yellowish frons. The wings have a dark orange to red color pattern that contrasts with a prominent pale bluish-gray base. The apical venation is bright red, and the wing tips are dark, with a brown basal spot in the inner apical cell. Adults are 2.6-2.7 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)
Rare but likely overlooked, recorded recently a couple times from the lower mountains and Piedmont. Has been found in mixed hardwood forest and forest edge.Vitis sp., Rubus sp., Cersis sp., Ilex decidua (3I)
Telamona collinaThis species is brownish overall, with a tall and prominent forward-facing pronotal crest. Rare, recorded from a few counties in the Piedmont and mountains; possibly more abundant.Platanus occidentalis (CTNC); Quercus macrocarpa (bur oak) (Wallace 2014)
Sayiana sayiA pale, bicolored species: the head, thorax and base of the wings are whitish while the posterior 2/3 of the wings are a golden color [in fresh individuals]. The wings greatly extend past the abdomen, with large antennal clubs extending out from the head. Along the costal margin of each wing, there is a characteristic hook-like projection projection.

Check here for multiple angles of a pinned specimen: UDEL. And for additional images of this species, see: BG.

A couple records from the mountains; rare.
Orientus ishidae
Japanese Leafhopper
A very distinctively marked and colored leafhopper, 4.3-6.5 mm in length. This species has an orange checkered appearance, with orange markings on the body and back amid black and white marks; the amount of orange can vary among individuals, with some mostly orange and others only partially orange. On the head there is an orange band extending between the eyes, followed by a white band at the edge before the head slopes downwards. The eyes can also be orange, and the legs are mostly orange except for a black base near the body.

Nymphs are tan, yellow, or reddish in color, sometimes boldly marked, with a narrow head and elongate antennae and contrastingly white feet, characteristic of this species (BG).

Scattered records across the state with a majority in the Piedmont; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Hardwood and mixed forests, forest edges/clearings, meadows and other grassy areas (BG).Various shrubs
Anotia uhleriA fairly distinctive member of this genus, it has yellowish wings with reddish-brown bases and two dark marks on each wing tip, consisting of a large reddish mark and a dark brown asymmetrical mark. The wing venation is reddish where the wings are dark and white where the wings are pale. Wing vein CuA is branched, with cells C5, C4, C3, and C3a similar in size. The thorax, abdomen, and head are reddish, and the antennal stubs are yellow.

For more images of this distinctive species, see here: BG.

Only recorded from a few counties across the state, rarely encountered.Derbidae are known or assumed to feed on fungal hyphae as immatures. Adults have been found on Acer (maples). (UDEL)
Hymetta balteataA boldly patterned species that can vary in darkness, coloration, and pattern. Adults have a pale yellowish-white body; the head and pronotum are largely a pale white color, sometimes with dull sanguineous spots present. The wings have a whitish base color, with three crossbands (see comments section below for crossband info). The first crossband is at most slightly narrowed along the costal margin; its posterior margin projects toward the wing tips, extending outwards past the dark spot near the claval suture of each wing. Crossband 3, the oblique dark band, is typically distinct. There is a transverse band at the apex of the wings (between crossband 3) that is at most indistinct; usually it is not present. There are three forms in this species.

- In the first, nominate form, the oblique band (crossband #3) at the tip of the wing is either not present or indistinct. The first crossband is dusky to black in color, darker near the costal margins. Crossband 2 is not present at all. There are relatively few red dots and flecks scattered across the wings.

- In form 'mediana' crossband #1 is a dark, dull red color (though in a number of individuals it appears as a faded brown). Crossband #2 is somewhat defined but not necessarily bold; it is orange to red in color. Crossband #3 is dusky to black in color. There are many dots scattered across the wings, including before crossband one and across the rest of the wing between crossband 1 and 2; there are also dots over the white costal plague.

- Form 'albata' is pale. Crossband #1 appears as a pale brown color; it is faint. There is no crossband #2, and crossband #3 ranges from smoky to a faded dusky color (but probably darker than the first band). This form was initially described as a form of H. trifasciata, which is probably the reason why this form has a strongly narrowed crossband #1 at the costal margin.

Adults are 3.1-3.4 mm long. Nymphs are a dark gray overall. For more pics of this species, see: BG. (Fairbairn, 1928)

Recorded from across the state, with most records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain where it can be common; likely more abundant across the state in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest and forest edge.Vitis spp., Toxicodendron radicans, Cercis canadensis, Hamamelis sp. (3I)
Hymetta trifasciataA boldly patterned species that can vary in darkness. Adults have a pale yellowish-white body; the head and pronotum are largely a pale white color, sometimes with dull sanguineous spots present. The wings have a whitish base color, with three crossbands (see comments section below for crossband info). The first crossband is strongly narrowed along the costal margin; this band is quite dark and can have a reddish anterior border. The second crossband consists of a series of broken dark marks. The third crossband is the bold, dark diagonal lines across the apical cells of the wings. There are some scattered red dots across the wings, mostly between the first two crossbands; there are very few if any spots before the first crossband. The costal plaque is chalky white (the bright white rectangular mark between the two crossbands, on the costal margin. Adults are 3.0-3.4 mm long, with an average of 3.2 mm. (Fairbairn, 1928)

For images of this species, see: BG.

Rare but probably overlooked due to confusion with H. balteata. Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont, probably more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest.Vitis sp., Redbud (Cercis canadensis) (3I)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Hymetta kansasensisThe most boldly-marked member of this genus. The wings are milky-white with a bold, dark brown and red color pattern. The first two crossbands are brownish to reddish, with the first typically quite thick and strongly narrowed on the costal margin while the second is more of a broken oblique zig-zag line running from the plaque to the transverse apical red line; together they tend to form a large, characteristic dark saddle. The third band is a very dark inverted V. The costal plaque is [sometimes] dark. There is a black dot on the corium which touches the claval suture, and a small brownish spot on the clavus caudad of these; there are many small reddish flecks on the corium, clavus and [sometimes] costal plaque. The vertex is either unicolorous or with orange parallel submedial lines, often with a lateral branch. The disc of the pronotum is usually darkened, resulting in a diagnotistic yellowish-brown circular patch. The scutellum has a small black dot at the apex. The thoracic venter is entirely pale. Adults are 3.2-3.5 mm long. (3I; Fairbairn, 1928)

For more images of this species, see: BG. For diagrams of this species, see: 3I.

Rare, only known from one county in the state, in the Piedmont; likely overlooked. Can be found in mixed hardwood forest. Cercis canadensis (red bud) (3I)
Excultanus excultusA distinctive species with a yellowish body (head and pronotum) and dark wings that have 3 small white discs along the wing edges where the wings meet on the back (BG). The head is also narrower than the thorax (visible from above), with the vertex about 1/4 longer in the middle than next to the eyes. The wings have a dark checkered appearance to them; the outer rear edge of the wings has small white dots along a black border. The underside of the body and back is dark, contrasting with the pale body. The female pregenital sternite is broadly excavated about 2/3 of the way to the anterior margin; the sides of the sloping lateral margins are slightly produced and rounded. The male plates are broad and triangular, with the apexes bluntly pointed. Adults are 6.0-6.5 mm long. (DeLong & Hershberger 1949)

For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Uncommon, scattered records across the state. Has been recorded in grassy, field-type habitats, as well as in open, mixed hardwood, and pine forests.
Entylia carinataA highly variable species. Adults have a characteristic pronotal shape that distinguishes this species from other NC treehoppers. Mature females have the front pronotal projection curving backwards, whereas males have shorter projections. Adults have orange colored legs and typically a dark underside to the thorax and abdomen. Adult males are 4.5 mm long while females are 5.0 mm.

Nymphs have multiple spiny projections across the body, including a pair of spines down the abdomen. As they age, the develop a structure on the thorax that is reminiscent of the adults pronotal shape.

An abundant species, recorded in a majority of the counties in the state; locally common where present. Seasonal distribution: 13 March-19 December (CTNC)Has been recorded in a variety of habitats, including montane and mixed hardwood forest and pine-dominanted areas.Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Ambrosia sp., Aster sp., Bidens bipinnata, B. coronata, Bidens sp., Conyza canadensis, Dahlia sp., Erechtites hieraciifolia, Erigeron sp., Eupatorium capillifolium, E. pilosum, Eupatorium sp., Glycine max, Helianthus anuus, H. tuberosus, Helianthus sp., Quercus palustris, Silphium sp., Solanum tuberosum, Solidago sp., Verbesina alternifolia, Vitis rotundifolia (CTNC)
Publilia concavaA highly variable species, with many color forms. Females are larger than males, and have a two-humped pronotum, with one above the head and the other midway on the pronotum. Males lack distinct peaks on their pronotum. There are prominent longitudinal ridges across the pronotum, which has a heavily punctate appearance. The legs are a yellowish-orange, and the lateral sides of the body and underside of the thorax and abdomen are black.

Nymphs are bicolored, with black over a green base; they have small spines extending from the abdomen in a single row.

Mostly restricted to the mountains, where it is common. Seasonal distribution: late May-7 October (CTNC)Has been found in brushy vegetation near mixed hardwood, high elevation forest.Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Ambrosia sp., Eupatorium sp., Helianthus sp., Solidago sp. (CTNC); also from Erigeron sp., Verbesina alternifolia (CTGSMNP)
Graminella planaA pale yellowish-orange species with four small but prominent black dots on the anterior margin of the vertex; the ocelli are also black, giving the impression of two more dots. The vertex is bluntly angled, one-fourth wider between the eyes than the median length. The face is pale, concolorous with the vertex. The wings are yellowish-orange with pale venation. The female pregenital sternite has short lateral margins, with rounded lobes on either side of a broad, sunken, truncated or slightly produced portion in the middle of the segment that is embrowned. The male subgenital plates are short and broad, with broad apices that are bluntly rounded. Adults are around 3.5-4.0 mm long. (DeLong & Mohr 1937)

Nymphs are pale with two bold longitudinal lines running from the tip of the vertex to the tip of the abdomen. They have spots along the margin of the characteristic, characteristic of the adults.

For additional images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a couple counties in the mountains and Piedmont, likely more abundant in the right habitat. Has been found near mixed hardwood forest and in grassy areas.
Hymetta anthismaA boldly patterned species that can vary in darkness, coloration, and pattern. Adults have a pale yellowish-white body; the head and pronotum are largely a pale white color, sometimes with dull sanguineous spots present. The wings have a whitish base color, with three crossbands (see comments section below for crossband info). The first crossband is at most slightly narrowed along the costal margin. Crossband 3, the oblique dark band, is typically distinct. There is a transverse band at the apex of the wings (between crossband 3) that is at most indistinct; usually it is not present. There are two forms in this species.

- The first, nominate form is characterized by many red dots scattered across all of the wings, including on top of the brown crossband, leading up to the transverse band near the wingtip. These dots can be large and are a brighter red; there are typically numerous spots, in some individuals the speckling can be quite dense. Crossband #1 is a brilliant red and crossband #3 is more smoky than black; the second crossband is orange and quite distinct. The posterior margin of crossband 1 projects toward the wing tips, extending outwards past the dark spot near the claval suture of each wing.

- Form 'distincta' has the red dots restricted largely to the base of the wings, before and across crossband #1; the rest of the wing is mostly white with a small number of dots. Crossband #1 tends to be very broad, characteristic of this species (though there are exceptions). More importantly, the posterior margin of the crossband extends essentially straight across the wing from the costal margin to the black dot; it does not project past the black spot. Crossband #2 is obsolete; it is not present. Crossband #3 is typically absent, but if present it is indistinct. There is also a dusky transverse band between crossband 3, across the apex of the wing.

Adults are 3.3-3.6 mm long. (Fairbairn, 1928) For more pics of this species, see: BG.

Scattered records across the Piedmont and mountains where it can be locally common; likely more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found in mixed hardwood forest and forest edge.Cercis canadensis, Vitis spp. (3I)
Penestragania robustaA green species (fading to yellow with age and/or in collected specimens), with many short black hairs (setae) scattered across the surface of the wings; sometimes these hairs can be pale, and there may be dark rings at the base of them. The vertex is short and broadly rounded, less wide than the pronotum. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is barely excavated and is slightly bisinuate, with a small median projection. Adult males are 3.2-4.3 mm long, females are 3.6-4.7 mm. (Beamer & Lawson, 1945), (Blocker, 1970)

Nymphs have a green body, densely covered with white pubescence which grows thicker and longer as the nymph ages.

See here for more images of this species: BG.

Rare in the state (but possibly overlooked or undercollected), with records from only a single county in the Piedmont (though Blocker 1970 indicates there are other records for the state).Blocker (1970) notes multiple host plants for this species; those reported from the southeastern United States are: Axonopus compressus, Cynodon dactylon, Iva sp., Larrea tridentata glutinosa, Medicago sativa, Paspalum notatum, & Prunus augustifolia
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Thelia bimaculata
Locust Treehopper
This species has a pronounced horn that is angled upward. Adult males are a deep chocolate-brown to black with a broad yellow blotch on both sides of the pronotum; the head is also yellowish. Females resemble the males, but have a faded or aged look to them: the yellow patch is still present, contrasting with the rest of the grayish pronotum, but it appears dirty rather than the clean, sharp colors present on the male. In both sexes, the tegmina is hyaline with smoky apices; the undersurface of the of the body is gray-brown and pubescent, darker in males. Adult females are 11 mm long, not counting the horn, while males are slightly smaller and less robust. (Kopp & Yonke, 1974)

Nymphs are dark and have a row of small spines down the back of the abdomen, and a small but noticeable forward-facing horn on the top of the thorax.

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Primarily found in the mountains, with several records from the Piedmont. Seasonal distribution: 10 June-19 October (CTNC)Has been found near mixed hardwood forest; where Black Locusts are present. It tends to prefer younger Black Locust, especially trees in more direct sunlight, typically avoiding trees in dense forest (BG).Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) (CTNC); typically only found on this plant, but can sometimes be found resting on other plant species such as Fagus grandifolia (American beech), Gleditsia triacanthos (honeylocust), Sambucus (elderberry), Salix nigra (black willow) (Wallace 2014).
Telonaca altaA greenish-brown species with a prominent pronotal crest. The crest itself can vary among individuals, with some specimens having a 'step' or hump on the posterior side of the crest, while other individuals may lack this step completely. The wings are mostly hyaline, with a smoky tip. Adult males are 10 mm long, while females are 10.5 mm (FSCA).Rare, recorded from a couple counties in the Coastal Plain; possibly more abundant along the coast.Coastal forest where oak is present.Quercus laurifolia, Q. nigra (FSCA); also on Q. laevis (turkey oak), Q. virginiana (live oak) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona excelsaThe pronotal color of this species is sexually dimorphic. Females are a uniform yellow-green, while males are yellow-brown with prominent lateral dark stripes on the posterior edge of the pronotoum, continuing to form a transverse band; the anterior part of the crest may also be a dark brown color. The posterior part of the pronotum is a reddish-brown, and in both sexes the wings have a dark brown tip. The pronotal crest is quadrate, prominent, highly elevated, and smoothly textured; the crest is much more broad in females than males. Males are 11 mm long while females are 12 mm (FSCA). (Wallace 2015)Scattered records across the state, uncommon. Seasonal distribution: 29 April- 27 October (CTNC)Castanea dentata (American chestnut), Carya (hickory), Carya cordiformis (bitternut hickory), Carya illinoinensis (pecan), Carya ovata (shagbark hickory), Carya glabra (pignut hickory), Carya pallida (sand hickory), Carya tomentosa (mockernut hickory), Juglans (walnut) [nymph on this host], J. cinerea (butternut), J. nigra (black walnut), Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper), Quercus alba (white oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. phellos (willow oak), Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust), Tilia americana (American basswood), Vitis (grape) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona westcottiA somewhat distinctive species with a detailed color pattern across the pronotum, consisting of white, green, and black. Some individuals are more mottled green than others. The wings have a black base and tip, and the underside is dark. This species has a short pronotal crest compared to other members of this genus.A few records from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Seasonal distribution: 25 June-5 September (CTNC)Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.Quercus alba (white oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak), Tilia (basswood), Ulmus (elm) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona reclivataFemales are reddish-brown, with a dark brown posterior tip to the pronotum and a dark brown pronotal band that continues onto the crest. The crest itself is sort of broad and tall in the female. Males are smaller than the female, with a noticeably less pronounced pronotum. Males have a greenish-brown pronotum. Both sexes have a smoky dark tip to the wings.Uncommon, scattered records across the state. Seasonal distribution: 2 June-31 August (CTNC)Has been found near mixed hardwood forest; where White Oak is present.Quercus alba (CTNC); also Q. rubra (CTGSMNP) and Castanea dentata (American chestnut), Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Populus tremuloides Michx. (quaking aspen), Q. bicolor (swamp white oak), Q. coccinea (scarlet oak), Quercus ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak), Q. velutina (black oak) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona projectaAn unmistakable species with a distinctive pronotal crest that strongly angles forward, almost resembling a reversed fish fin. The pronotal color is grayish-brown to dark brown with some pale mottling. (Wallace, 2015)Recorded a couple times in the Piedmont, representing a first state record for this species.Mixed hardwood forest where Quercus (oak) is present.Nymphs have been found on Quercus alba (white oak) and Q. velutina (black oak), and adults have been found on Q. laurifolia (laurel oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Q. stellata (post oak), and Vitis vinifera (wine or wild grape) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona monticolaThis species usually has a greenish to brown pronotum with scattered with pale yellowish spots. The pronotal crest is [typically] tall and somewhat block-shaped, edged on the top in red; the posterior edge to the crest may be yellow. The pronotal crest may slope downwards more in males than females, and some individuals can have a small crest. The wing tip is a smoky brown, and the wing venation is brown; the rest of the wing is hyaline. The legs are green to brown. Males tend to be smaller than females, being 10 to 11 mm long compared to 11 mm for females (FSCA).Recorded across the state, uncommon. Seasonal distribution: 20 April-18 October (CTNC)Mixed hardwood forestQuercus falcata, Q. margarettae, Q. nigra, Q. rubra, Q. stellata, Vitis rotundifolia (CTNC); also on Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) (CTGSMNP)

Carya cordiformis (bitternut hickory), C. ovata (shagbark hickory), C. pallida (sand hickory), Crataegus (hawthorn), Juglans cinerea (butternut), Nyssa sylvatica (blackgum), Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper), Populus grandidentata (bigtooth aspen), Prunus serotina (black cherry), Quercus alba (white oak) [nymphs on this host], Q. bicolor (swamp white oak) [nymphs], Q. coccinea (scarlet oak) [nymphs], Q. ellipsoidalis (northern pin oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak) [nymphs], Q. imbricaria (shingle oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak) [nymphs], Q. marilandica (blackjack oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak) [nymphs], Q. muehlenbergii (chinkapin oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Q. phellos (willow oak), Q. velutina (black oak) [nymphs], Salix (willow), Sambucus nigra ssp. canadensis (American black elderberry), Smilax (greenbrier), Tilia (basswood) (Wallace 2014).
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Telamona maculataA reddish-brown species with a broad, tall pronotal crest (almost a plateau shape). The posterior tip of the pronotum is red, followed by a pale brown and then a dark brown, almost black band. The pronotal horns may be reddish as well and extend well to the sides of the rest of the pronotum. The front of the head is pale. Uncommon, recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and mountains. Seasonal distribution: 10 May- October (CTNC)Forest with oakCarya (hickory), Quercus alba (white oak) [nymphs on this plant], Q. bicolor (swamp white oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona extremaA large species with a broad, tall, rounded pronotal crest that slightly angles forward. The top of the pronotal crest is edged in red, and the posterior edge is yellow. The pronotum itself is usually a light brown color, but some individuals can have a greenish tint; there may be some light maculations across the pronotum in some specimens as well. The wings have a smoky tip, and the legs are concolorous with the pronotum. Males are 8-9 mm long while females are 9-10 mm (FSCA). A somewhat rare species, with scattered records from several counties across the state.Forest with oakQuercus alba (white oak), Q. ilicifolia [nymphs on this plant], Q. marilandica (blackjack oak), Q. phellos (willow oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Q. velutina (black oak) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona dubiosaA reddish-brown species with a prominent, raised pronotal crest with a sharp angle to the rear. It can have a "dotted" pattern across the pronotum.Recorded from the Coastal Plain, rare in the state. Seasonal distribution: 21 September-11 October (CTNC)Quercus alba (CTNC), Q. montana (chestnut oak) (Wallace 2014)
Telamona decorataA sexually dimorphic species. This species is grayish-green to reddish-brown overall, with a varied mottled color pattern of light and dark. This pattern is much more pronounced in females, whose crest is a vibrant dark brown to reddish-brown and is block-shaped; the crest coloration contrasts with the paler front and sides of the pronotum, with a curved dark band arching downwards from the crest towards the lateral edge of the pronotum. The tip of the female pronotum is a reddish to reddish-brown color. The male pronotal crest is smaller and not as high compared to other members of this genus and is more of a rounded triangular shape but, like the females, is dark. In both sexes, the trailing edge of the crest is pale. There is frequently some light pale speckling across the front of the pronotum. The tips of the wings are dark with a smoky smudge while the wing venation is pale, lined with dark; the rest of the wings are hyaline.Recorded from the mountains, with a single record from the Coastal Plain. Seasonal distribution: 19 June-13 September (CTNC)MontaneCastanea dentata (American chestnut), but largely oaks: Quercus alba, Q. rubra (CTNC); also Q. stellata (CTGSMNP), Populus (cottonwood) [nymphs on this plant], Tilia americana (American basswood), Acer (maple), Carya ovata (shagbark hickory), Q. bicolor (swamp white oak) [nymphs on this plant], Q. coccinea (scarlet oak), Q. ellipsoidalis (northern pin oak), Q. falcata (southern red
oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak) [nymphs], Q. macrocarpa (bur oak) [nymphs], Q. montana (chestnut oak), Q. phellos (willow oak), Q. velutina (black oak) [nymphs], and Robinia (locust) (Wallace 2014).
Telamona concavaA striking member of this genus, with a color pattern that varies among specimens. Typically, the body is a combination of a dark brown to black color with green to bluish blotches across the pronotum and on the legs. The pronotum has a prominent and tall crest, with a rounded top and a small posterior 'step'; the exact shape of the pronotal crest can vary between individuals (BG).Recorded recently from the Piedmont and mountains, possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.Quercus alba (white oak), Q. velutina (black oak) (Wallace 2014)
Heliria scalarisRecorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont.Carya (hickory), Crataegus (hawthorn), Fagus grandifolia (American beech), Malus (apple), Prunus americana (American plum), Salix (willow) (Wallace 2014).
Heliria molarisRecorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont and mountains.Nymphs have been found on Q. bicolor (swamp white oak) and Q. macrocarpa (bur oak); adults have been found on Populus (cottonwood), Quercus alba (white oak), and Q. velutina (black oak) (Wallace 2014).
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Heliria gibberataA brownish, mottled species with a prominent pronotal crest that is peaked in the front. Adults have a very broad front of the pronotum, extending well to the side of the eyes. Males are 10.5 mm long while females are 11.0 mm. See FSCA for images of male and female pinned specimens. Rare, only recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont and mountains. Seasonal distribution: 23 May-late June (CTNC)Celtis occidentalis (common hackberry) (CTNC); adults have been found on Carpinus caroliniana (American hornbeam) and Quercus alba (white oak) (Wallace 2014).
Heliria gemmaThe dorsal margin of the pronotal crest slopes posteriorly. Males are densely pubescent, and the pronotum is mottled brown with traces of a creamy tooth and posterior stripe. Females are creamy with brown mottling, particularly emphasized on the crest, and there is an oblique stripe in the rear third of the pronotum; the posterior edge of the crest is a creamy yellowish-white. Adult males are 8-9 mm long, female are 11 mm with a width and height of 5.5 mm. (Kopp & Yonke 1974)Rare, recorded from a couple counties in the mountains.Possibly Populus grandidentata (Wallace 2014)
Heliria fitchiA greenish-brown species with a double-lobed pronotal crest, but not as strongly lobed as in H. cristata. The wings have dark venation and a smoky, brown mark at the tips. Rare with a single recent record from the western Piedmont.Has been found in higher elevation mixed hardwood forest.Quercus alba (white oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak) (Wallace 2014)
Heliria cristataA very distinctive, stunning species with a double-lobed pronotal crest, characteristic of this species; the frontal lobe is higher than the back one and projects forward. Adults range in color from brownish to a light green color and have a very broad front of the pronotum, extending well to the side of the eyes. Previously reported from Eastern NC, though not clear where in particular (CTNC). Likely uncommon to rare with two recent sightings from the Piedmont and mountains.Where oak is present.Quercus macrocarpa (bur oak) (CTNC); adults have also been found on Celtis occidentalis (common hackberry), Corylus (hazelnut), Fagus grandifolia (American beech), Quercus alba (white oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Q. stellata (post oak), and Q. velutina (black oak) (Wallace 2014).
Heliria cornutulaA brownish to light green colored species with a broad pronotal crest that is peaked in the front. Adults have a very broad front of the pronotum, extending well to the side of the eyes.Scattered records across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; uncommon to rare. Seasonal distribution: June-15 November (CTNC)Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) (Wallace 2014)
Glossonotus turriculatusA brown to grayish-brown species with a long, slender and narrow pronotal horn that slopes forward. The inner margin of the horn and part of the pronotum can have a light yellowish stripe that contrasts with the darker color of the pronotum. The face is pale yellowish and the legs are yellow.

For images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a couple counties in the mountains. Seasonal distribution: 15-20 June (CTNC)Crataegus sp., Quercus sp. (CTNC), and Quercus alba (white oak). Adults have also been found on Carya (hickory), Populus (cottonwood), Q. bicolor (swamp white oak), Q. coccinea (scarlet oak), Q. ellipsoidalis (northern pin oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Q. velutina (black oak), and Robinia (locust) (Wallace 2014).
Glossonotus univittatusA reddish-brown to dark brown species that resembles G. turriculatus but has a shorter pronotal horn. Like G. turriculatus, this species has a whitish edge to the inner part of the pronotal horn and the pronotum, often times extending to the rear tip of the pronotum. Several records across the state; uncommon to rare. Seasonal distribution: 16 May-4 August (CTNC)Quercus alba, Q. rubra (CTNC); also Q. falcata (CTGSMNP) as well as Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), and Q. velutina (black oak) (Wallace 2014). Adults have additionally been found on Betula alleghaniensis (yellow birch), Castanea dentata (American chestnut), Carya (hickory), Corylus americana (American hazelnut), Prunus serotina (black cherry), Q. berberidifolia (California scrub oak), Q. bicolor (swamp white oak), Q. coccinea (scarlet oak), Q. ellipsoidalis (northern pin oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Salix nigra (black willow), Salix scouleriana (Scouler’s willow), and Vitis (grape) (Wallace 2014).
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Glossonotus acuminatusA grayish-brown species with a long, slender pronotal horn with a rounded tip. The horn can be mottled, with black lining the edge and white spots present on the surface. Nymphs are brownish overall, a similar color to that of the adults. There is a row of pairs of spines going down the abdomen, as well as a pair of spines in the middle of the thorax. A small forward-facing horn projects from the pronotum.Seasonal distribution: 6 May-14 June (CTNC)Southern red oak (Quercus falcata) (CTNC); has also been associated with American Chestnut (Castanea dentata) and black oak (Q. velutina) . Adults have additionally been found on Pyrus (pear), Quercus alba (white oak), Q. bicolor (swamp white oak), Q. coccinea (scarlet oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Q. phellos (willow oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Q. stellata (post oak), and Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) (Wallace 2014).
Carynota meraA variable grayish-brown species, sometimes with a broad reddish-black triangular band across the middle of the pronotum and a reddish tip to the pronotum; some individuals may have a greenish tint. This species has a noticeably rounded and elevated pronotum, which is finely punctate pubescent. The tegmina is smoky hyaline with prominent veins and a dark brown tip. The head is very distinctly punctate and sparingly pubescent with short white hairs. Above the black eyes are several small black marks. The legs and underside of the body are ferruginous. Adult males are 8.5 mm long and 4 mm wide, while females are 10 mm long and 5 mm wide. (FSCA), (Kopp & Yonke, 1974)

Nymphs are brownish in color, with a darker brown thorax and speckling across the body. Click here for a neat image of an adult and nymph together.

Uncommon with scattered records across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Seasonal distribution: 21 May-late October (CTNC)Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.Pecan (Carya illinoiensis), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), bitternut hickory (Carya cordiformis), butternut (Juglans cinerea), black walnut (Juglans nigra) (Kopp & Yonke, 1974); adults have additionally been found on C. pallida (sand hickory), Quercus alba (white oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Tilia americana (American basswood), and Vernonia (ironweed) (Wallace 2014).
Carynota marmorata
Marbled Treehopper
A very striking species that is variable in color and pattern, usually some shade of chestnut-brown, and typically mottled with irregular yellowish to greenish-white speckling across the pronotum. The speckling varies between individuals, with some heavily spotted individuals and others with broader, more connected pale [yellow] patches that may form transverse bands across the pronotum. This species has a fairly high and rounded pronotal crest, and the pronotum is coarsely punctate and sparingly pubescent. The head is triangular and marked with red and yellow patches; it is finely punctate and sparingly pubescent. The eyes are red to black. The tegmina is smoky hyaline with prominent veins. The underside of the body is chestnut and the legs are ferruginous. Adults are 8 mm long and 4 mm wide. (Kopp & Yonke, 1974)

For more images of adults, see: BG.

Rare to uncommon, recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and mountains. Seasonal distribution: 6 June-30 July (CTNC)Where birch trees (Betula) occur.Betula sp. (CTNC); Betula papyrifera (paper birch) and hazel (Kopp & Yonke, 1974); Alnus incana (gray alder), Corylus americana (American hazelnut), Populus (cottonwood), and Quercus alba (white oak) (Wallace 2014).
Archasia pallidaA variably colored species, ranging from yellow to brown to green to blue with a heavy dark line along the ridge and indistinct scattered pale spots. This species has a somewhat rounded, pyramidal crest that is shorter than the other two members of this genus, sloping toward the head. Females have a higher crest than males, and there is a thin brownish fringe to the crest. There are also several black dots above the eyes on the pronotum. The tegmina are largely hyaline with a blackish smudge at the tips; the venation is pale. Males are 8 mm long, while females are 9 mm; height of pronotum is 4.5 mm. (FCSA), (Kopp & Yonke, 1974)A somewhat uncommon to rare species, with several recent records from the Piedmont. Found from late April to early July (FCSA) Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.Quercus sp. (FCSA) ; also Q. palustris (pin oak) and Q. phellos (willow oak) (Wallace 2014).
Archasia belfrageiA distinctive green species with the dorsal crest of the pronotum rising nearly vertically above the head. The pronotum is high and strongly foliaceous, with a thin but bold brown margin; it is closely but weakly punctate and is not pubescent. The head is nearly twice as wide as long and is smooth, sparingly pubescent. The eyes are [typically] a very prominent brown. The tegmina are smoky hyaline with a dark brown smudge at the tips of the wings; the venation is brownish. The undersurface of the body is yellow-brown, the abdomen is brown and the legs are a dull yellow-brown; the tibiae are pubescent. Adults are around 9 mm long and 4.5 mm wide, and the pronotum has a height of 5 mm. (Kopp & Yonke, 1974)

Nymphs are brownish, with a short crest rising from the pronotum.

Uncommon with scattered records across the state. Seasonal distribution: 12 May-11 September (CTNC)Has been found near mixed hardwood forest. Quercus alba, Q. phellos (CTNC); has also been collected from Quercus falcata, Platanus occidentalis, and Robinia pseudoacacia (CTGSMNP), as well as black oak, bur oak, wild grape, plum, goldenrod, and apple (Kopp & Yonke, 1974); nymphs have also been found on Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. montana (chestnut oak), and Q. stellata (post oak) (Wallace 2014). Adults have additionally been associated with Liriodendron tulipifera (tuliptree), Q. bicolor (swamp white oak), Q. coccinea (scarlet oak), Q. palustris (pin oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Q. virginiana (live oak), Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust), Solidago (goldenrod), Vaccinium (blueberry), Vitis riparia (riverbank grape), and Vitis vinifera (wine or wild grape) (Wallace 2014).
Archasia auriculataA green species with a very high and rounded pronotum (typically more so than A. belfragei) that is strongly foliaceous, covered with dense pale speckling. The dorsal crest overhangs the head, and the brownish edge to the crest is broken by scattered pale spots, both features characteristic of this species. The head is smooth and sparingly pubescent, while the pronotum is closely but distinctly punctate and sparsely pubescent. The tegmina is smoky hyaline with darker tips, contrasting with the green pronotum. The underside and legs are a yellowish-brown. Adults are 9- 11 mm long and 4.5-5.0 mm wide with a 6 mm high pronotum. (Kopp & Yonke, 1974) Scattered records across the state, very uncommon. Seasonal distribution: 9 May-27 August (CTNC)Water oak (Quercus nigra), black oak (Q. velutina) (CTNC); northern pin oak, blackjack oak, chinquapin oak, pin oak (Kopp & Yonke, 1974); also white oak (Q. alba). Adults have additionally been associated with Castanea dentata (American chestnut), Carya (hickory), Eupatorium
(thoroughwart), Q. chapmanii (Chapman oak), Q. falcata (southern red oak), Q. gambelii (Gambel oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Q. stellata
(post oak), and Verbena hastata (swamp verbena) (Wallace 2014)
Thionia quinquataA uniformly brown species, with small fine black points all over the body. The prominent wing venation and the claws are also black. The vertex of the head is narrow, with the lateral margins diverging; this gives the vertex, which is relatively flat on the top without any pronounced margins, more of a chevron-like shape than other species in the genus (BG). This subtle but important field mark can be useful in differentiating from the similar T. bullata. Adults, at least females, are large for this genus, being 8 mm long from tip of the head to apex of the wings (T. quinquata). See here for images of an adult female: lateral, dorsal, and frontal. Nymphs are greenish with orange transverse stripes down the back and an orange margin to the head. The head length itself is distinctive, as the head noticeably extends past the eyes, converging to form a triangle when viewed from above. Uncommon to rare, or rarely collected, across the state, primarily in the Piedmont. Mixed hardwood forest and pine forest.Pines, though has also been recorded from oak and sweetgum (probably was resting on these trees).
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Rhynchomitra recurvaA green species that resembles R. microrhina except for the head length and shape. In recurva, the head is not as long and as tapered as that of microrhina (which has a long, pointed and strongly tapered head), but not as short as that of lingula; recurva's head is stout and not sharply pointed. When viewed dorsally, the head has a rounded shape to it rather than elongated and pointed. Nymphs are supposedly darker than those of R. microrhina, being dark brown in color.

For a couple images of nice adults, see here and here.

Recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, possibly more abundant in the right habitat; very uncommon to rare.Has been found near mixed hardwood forest.Eragrostis curvula (weeping lovegrass, Poaceae) (UDEL)
Rhynchomitra microrhinaA green species with a long, tapered, sharply pointed head. The legs and outer margin of part of the wings can be orange-brown, and the wing venation is green. For more images of a pinned adult, see here: UDEL. Nymphs are light brownish-orange overall, showing the characteristicly long, tapered head found in the adult. A somewhat common species, found across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain.Has been found in grassy fields, as well as near mixed hardwood forest.Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush, Rubiaceae), Eragrostis curvula (weeping lovegrass, Poaceae), Hibiscus moscheutos (crimsoneyed rosemallow, Malvaceae) (UDEL)
Chlorotettix spatulatusTypically a uniform green color with some yellowish tinge, this species can vary greatly in coloration and be reddish-orange. The vertex has margins that are parallel or slightly longer in the middle than next to the eyes; the vertex is two and a half times wider than it is long, giving the head a pointed shape. The wings are subyhaline in color typically, with indistinct venation. The posterior margin of the female pregenital sternite is broadly notched more than half way to the base; there is a spatulate process in the middle of this excavation that extends two-thirds the length of the notch. The lateral posterior margins of the sternite are triangular. The male plates are broad at the bases and acutely pointed. Adults are around 7.0 mm long. (DeLong 1948), (DeLong 1918)

Nymphs tend to be reddish in color. For diagrams of the genitalia of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Only recorded from Wake county in the Piedmont; likely under collected and therefore under reported.Moist grassy areas, meadows, marshes (DeLong 1948)
Neocenchrea heidemanniA pale, mostly white species with elongated wings and a slim, slender body structure. There are two main areas of color, on the thorax & head and the antennae. A broad white midline, beginning on the head and extending across the thorax, separates two orange patches that cover the sides of the thorax and head. The antennae are also orange. Recorded from several counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, rare; possibly more abundant in the right habitat.Has been found near mixed hardwood forest. Arecaceae
Synecdoche griseaA grayish-brown species with many pale, sometimes incomplete cross veins on otherwise gray to blackish wings. The pronotum and head are yellowish-brown with orange and black markings. The face is pale and mostly concolorous, slightly mottled on the sides (darker brown with small black spots) with two pale dividing median lines. The underside of the thorax is pale yellowish while the underside of the abdomen is blackish.

See here for pics of a couple pinned specimens: UDEL and BG.

Recorded from a few counties in the mountains and Piedmont, rare.?
Paraphlepsius strobiA pale brownish species with a rounded crown that is bluntly angled apically and angled towards the face. The thorax and head are concolorous with the wings, which have a [faint] banded appearance to them. The male subgenital plates are elongate and triangular. The female pregenital sternite has a somewhat slight concave posterior margin, with a slight median notch and brownish coloration along the edge. Adult males are 4.7-5.9 mm long, females are 5.0-6.1 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For more images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely under collected and therefore more abundant in the right habitat.
Scaphoideus melanotusA dark, blackish species with an interrupted white dorsal longitudinal stripe. The crown is white, with a brown anterior marginal line interrupted at the apex; there is a transverse orange line between the anterior margins of the eyes, with a diamond-shaped mark anteriorly produced in the middle. The eyes are described as being brown with a white longitudinal line, but appear red or bicolored in some individuals. The face is a diagnostic intense black, sometimes with a small white medial dot below the crown margin and on the clypeus. The anterior third of the pronotum is orange with two small medial black or brown dots; the medial posterior two-thirds is white, sometimes with light yellow-orange areas in the middle, and the posterior third is whitish; there is a dark brown to black area laterally on each side of the pronotum. The scutellum has the anterior half [largely, usually] yellow-brown with two medial white bards with posterior black dots (in some individuals, the color is more reddish-orange than yellow-brown); the posterior half of the scutellum is white with lateral black dots. The wings are mostly black, with black venation; some cells though are white translucent [particularly down the commissure]. The coxae are black and the hind femur is sometimes light brown; the rest of the leg segments are yellowish-brown. The abdominal terga are dorsally brown, and laterally and ventrally white; the third sternum is brown, the remaining are brown and white. The male subgenital plates are narrow with two large medial setae. The pygofer is brown and white, with a dark brwno oblique bar near the posterior third. The female pregenital sternite is anteriorly white and posteriorly brown to black; the sternite is produced posteriorly, with a distinctive V-shaped notch in the median projection. Adult males are 4.9-5.3 mm long, females are 5.2-5.9 mm. (Barnett 1976)

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Uncommon, largely recorded from the mountains and Piedmont. Mixed hardwood forest, forest edges, montane hardwood forests, other wooded areas, meadows, etc.American elm, Juniperus spp., Opantia spp. (Barnett 1976)
sciNamedescriptionabundancehabitatfood
Scaphoideus pullusA rather dark Scaphoideus species, ranging from light to dark brown overall. The crown is white to yellowish white with a thin, dark anterior marginal line (the line may be broken or complete) and a brown to mandarin orange wavy band transversing the width of the vertex in front of the eyes (this band may be broken medially). The eyes are a very dark reddish color, sometimes with a white longitudinal line. The face is dark to light brown with the central area lighter, and there is a dark brown line below the crown margin. The pronotum may be a grayish-white color with a posterior transverse arc-shaped dark brown band and usually three equally spaced pairs of dark brown dots near the anterior margin; or the pronotum is white with an oblique dark brown bar on the lateral areas and a wrinkled dot at the anterior margin of the pronotum, sometimes with two medial anterior dark brown dots. The scutellum ranges from cadmium orange to deep yellow, with dark brown to blackish anterior lateral areas. The wings are dark, with an anterior dorsal area that is dark brown and the remaining areas concolorous with few white spots; the venation is brown. The coxae are dark brown, the rest of the legs are yellowish-brown. The abdominal venter is dark brown with only minor yellowish-white areas laterally. The male subgenital plates are dark brown and are long, narrow and bluntly rounded with large setae in the posterior medial area. The female pregenital sternite is yellowish to yellowish-white anteriorly, dark brown posteriorly; the posterior margin is produced medially, giving the sternite a triangular, pointed shape. Adult males are 5.0-5.9 mm long (can reach as small as 4.8 mm per specimens below), while females are 5.2-5.7 mm. (Barnett 1976)

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Recorded recently from a few counties in the Piedmont and mountains; probably more abundant in the right habitat.Recorded in or near mixed hardwood and open forest habitat.Ulmus americana, Hicoria, etc. (Barnett 1976)