Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Micrutalis dorsalis - No Common Name


No image for this species.
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: Smiliinae
Taxonomic Author: Fitch
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: This species resembles Micrutalis calva in shape and color pattern, but is almost twice as large as M. calva, measuring ~ 4 mm long. In fact, this species closely resembles Acutalis tartarea in size and pattern (some individuals of A. tartarea), differing only by the fact that A. tartarea has black wing venation while M. dorsalis has light venation. Compared to M. calva, M. dorsalis has the black on the pronotum more restricted (it does not extend across most of the pronotum, as in M. calva); the rest of the pronotum is a light brown color. See here and here for a couple dorsalis specimens.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern United States
Abundance: Restricted to the mountains. Seasonal distribution: 11 July-21 August (CTNC)
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats:
Plant Associates: ?
Behavior: To listen to the male courtship call for this genus, listen here. These courtship calls are not audible to the human ear, and the calls here are produced by recording the substrate vibrations that the treehoppers use to communicate through the plants themselves. The recorded call is then amplified so that it is now audible to human ears. Research has shown that treehoppers use vibrations to attract mates, to announce the discovery of a good feeding site, or to alert a defending mother to the approach of a predator (T.IM).
Comment:
Status: Native
Global and State Rank: