Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Neocoelidia tumidifrons - No Common Name



© Paul Scharf- female

© Rob Van Epps- male

© Rob Van Epps- male; note abdominal band
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: NeocoelidiinaeSynonym: Neocoelidia vittapennis
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A yellow-orange to green robust species with a rounded head the strongly projects outwards; the antennae are also quite long. Sometimes the tips of the wings are smoky, brown. Males are plainly colored green (fresh specimens) with no markings except for a black band near the tip of the abdomen. Females, green, have wings shorter than the length of the abdomen and have distinctive black marks around otherwise yellow eyes. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin broadly excavated with a small median tooth. The males subgenital plates are triangular and pointed, gradually taper from bases to pointed apexes. Adults are around 4.0 mm long. (DeLong 1948)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Found across the country, but scattered and uncommon to rare; as far north as Manitoba and as far south as Texas (Knull, 1942).
Abundance: Uncommon to rare with only several scattered records across the state.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy habitat; reportedly common in moist wooded areas where herbaceous growth is abundant (DeLong 1948)
Plant Associates: Goldenrod
Behavior:
Comment: The female of this species is flightless.

A similar species, Neocoelidia vittapennis, could also potentially be found in our area. It has a pair of black spots in the basal angles of the scutellum and dark brown longitudinal lines on the venation of the wings, especially the claval suture and costal margin. It occurs along the Gulf Coast and southern Atlantic coast. (DeLong 1953)

A second similar species, Neocoelidia orientalis, has been collected from nearby Tennessee in various locations. It resembles N. tumidifrons in coloration and appearance but is larger (4.0-5.0 mm) and with different male genitalia. The claval and costal wing veins are brown. The female pregenital sternite is long, with the posterior margin truncate. (DeLong 1953)

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Neocoelidia tumidifrons No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping. Dr. Hamilton\'s comments: A female Neocoelidia tumidifrons; on goldenrod, but not common that far east because it is flightless.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping - weedy edge of woods.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping - weedy edge of woods.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping - weedy edge of woods.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping - weedy edge of woods.