The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

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Related Species in CORDULEGASTRIDAE: Number of records for 2018 = 1

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e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Twin-spotted Spiketail by A. Fairbanks

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sciName Cordulegaster maculata
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Twin-spotted Spiketail
distribution Throughout the Piedmont, and essentially throughout the mountains and the western third/half of the Coastal Plain, being nearly absent from most counties east of Martin, Wayne, and Sampson (except for Onslow and New Hanover county records). Of somewhat spotty distribution in the southern half of the mountains. The range is thus somewhat similar to that of the Brown Spiketail in NC, but that species has been found in many fewer counties and its abundance is centered in the mountains and foothills; the Brown also has not yet been found in coastal counties.
abundance Seemingly declining in recent years. Uncommon but widespread in the Piedmont and extreme western Coastal Plain; rare to uncommon in the mountains, but quite rare in the central Coastal Plain and near the southern coast. Though not as numerous as many other spring-flying dragonflies, it is the most often seen spiketail in NC (but often outnumbered in the mountains by the Brown Spiketail). Shockingly, if not disturbingly, there were only two reports for the entire state in 2017.
flight Downstate, primarily from very late March to late May, with the peak in April. The mountain flight occurs from late March to mid-June, though it is scarce before May.
habitat Creeks or small rivers, of many sizes and substrates, for breeding. These are typically in forested or semi-shaded areas and fairly pristine or clear waters.
behavior Males cruise along streams, but adults are more more often seen well away from water along wooded roads or wide trails or wood margins. They perch conspicuously on twigs and other vegetation, in an oblique manner, typically only a foot or two above the ground, where easily studied.
comments This is one of the larger and more spectacular of the spring-season (only) dragonflies. It can be confused with the Brown Spiketail, which is less numerous (except in the mountains), is browner on the abdomen, has somewhat more equal-sized yellow spots on the abdomen, and is slightly smaller in length. In 2014, several observers found a colony close to the coast in New Hanover County and documented this noteworthy record with photos.
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S_rank S5
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G_rank G5
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Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Twin-spotted Spiketail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: R Emmitt

Comment: Caswell, 2018-04-28,
Photo by: Melissa Dowland

Comment: Transylvania, 2008-05-08, Patrolling a gravel road, perching horizontally on stems
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Gail Lankford

Comment: Buncombe, 2012-03-27, Cedar Hill Gamelands Northern Buncombe County, Temp upper 60s, Sunny, light northerly wind, - Male, seen along dirt road
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Gail Lankford

Comment: Buncombe, 2012-03-27, Cedar Hill Gamelands Northern Buncombe County, Temp upper 60s, Sunny, light northerly wind, - Male, seen along dirt road
Photo by: Doug Johnston

Comment: Buncombe, 2012-04-02, North Buncombe county Leicester patch
Photo by: Dennis Burnette,Doug Johnston, Gail Lankford, Janie Owens, Vin Stanton

Comment: Haywood, 2012-04-28, Found along Cold Creek, Pisgah Forest - Female
Photo by: A. Fairbanks and S. Covell

Comment: New Hanover, 2014-03-28, Halyburton Park, xeric sandhill scrub perched oblique 1-2ft above ground on young turkey oak - Sunny, low 70s, west of grass limesink pond approx 100 yards from perimeter of pond
Photo by: A. Fairbanks and S. Covell

Comment: New Hanover, 2014-03-28, Halyburton Park, xeric sandhill scrub perched oblique 1-2ft above ground on young turkey oak - Sunny, low 70s, west of grass limesink pond approx 100 yards from perimeter of pond
Photo by: A. Fairbanks and S. Covell

Comment: New Hanover, 2014-03-28, Halyburton Park, xeric sandhill scrub perched oblique 1-2ft above ground on young turkey oak - Sunny, low 70s, west of grass limesink pond approx 100 yards from perimeter of pond
Photo by: A. Fairbanks

Comment: New Hanover, 2014-04-02, Halyburton Park, green trail north side of cypress limesink - 2nd sighting at the park. Male
Photo by: Paul Hart

Comment: Harnett; P, 2010-04-03, RARO - Seen during hike with Wake Audubon group. Male.