The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

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Related Species in CORDULEGASTRIDAE: Number of records for 2018 = 4

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Brown Spiketail by Steve Hall and Harry LeGrand

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sciName Cordulegaster bilineata
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Brown Spiketail
distribution Throughout the mountains, and scattered across the Piedmont and the western portion of the Coastal Plain, including the Sandhills; a few recent photo records for the lower half of the Coastal Plain (Gates and Jones counties) Apparently absent in all coastal counties and most other eastern Coastal Plain counties.
abundance Fairly common in the mountains (at least in the northern counties), but uncommon in the western Piedmont, and rare to uncommon in the eastern Piedmont and Coastal Plain portion of the range. Much more common in the mountains than downstate. Possibly less numerous in the central Piedmont than on either side, as there are many records eastward and westward but with many counties lacking records in this part of the Piedmont.
flight Late April to early July in the mountains, but slightly advanced (as expected) in the Piedmont, where it flies from early April and extends at least to mid-June (if not later). The relatively few dates for the Coastal Plain fall from late March only to early May, but the flight surely must extend into June there.
habitat Small streams or seeps, often with little flow; typically in wooded areas.
behavior Typically flies slowly over streams or seeps or in nearby clearings. Perches on low twigs, in an oblique manner typical of spiketails.
comments This species can be confused with the somewhat similar, but slightly more widespread and definitely more numerous, Twin-spotted Spiketail. Both can occur together along mountain and Piedmont wooded roadsides and clearings along woods and small creeks. This species might have a slight bimodal distribution, as it seems surprisingly scarce in the central Piedmont. Steve Hall and Harry LeGrand saw and photographed the species on several occasions in 2012 near the Roanoke River, adding first records for Halifax and Northampton counties. Surprising were photo records in 2017 by Hunter Phillips for Jones County and by Signa and Floyd Williams for Gates County.
state_status
S_rank S4
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Brown Spiketail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: Mark Shields, John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Jackson, 2018-06-26, Panthertown Valley, Nantahala National Forest - in bog
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt.

Comment: Orange, 2018-05-07, Brumley Forest Preserve, South side of Hwy. NC 10. - Males. Seep below spring house.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Orange, 2017-04-22, Patrolling seep at Brumley Forest Nature Preserve. - Males.
Photo by: Hunter Phillips

Comment: Jones, 2017-04-09, Haywood Landing Recreation Site
Photo by: S. Williams, F. Williams

Comment: Gates, 2017-04-09, MEMI
Photo by: Timothy Deering

Comment: Buncombe, 2016-05-27, Dark Hollow Creek
Photo by: Jim Petranka

Comment: Buncombe, 2015-05-29, Along shaded, first-order stream at Sandy Bottom
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Gail Lankford, Janie Owen

Comment: Madison, 2014-05-21, River Road, French Broad River north of Hot Springs - Male
Photo by: Cary and David Paynter

Comment: Watauga, 2012-06-19, high elevation bog
Photo by: Doug Johnston

Comment: Buncombe, 2012-05-16, North Buncombe county Leicester patch
Photo by: Steve Hall and Harry LeGrand

Comment: Halifax, 2012-03-30, One male observed patrolling along a creek; one male and a mated pair photographed along a pipeline; all located near the Roanoke River
Photo by: Steve Hall and Harry LeGrand

Comment: Halifax, 2012-03-30, One male observed patrolling along a creek; one male and a mated pair photographed along a pipeline; all located near the Roanoke River
Photo by: Doug Johnston

Comment: Haywood, 2011-06-11, Road to Max Patch and Harmon Den
Photo by: Scott Hartley

Comment: Moore; C, Weymouth Woods-SNP, 2007-04-08
Photo by: Scott Hartley

Comment: Moore; C, Weymouth Woods-SNP, 2007-04-08
Photo by: ASH

Comment: Moore; C, 2007-04-08, WEWO - All were perched/hanging from small hardwoods. The cold made them pretty cooperative. Of the 8, only one is documented by a photo.
Photo by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: Watauga County, 2006-06-29, male
Photo by: Ed Corey

Comment: Transylvania, 2006-05-29, teneral
Photo by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: Ashe Co., 2005-06-25, female
Photo by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: Ashe Co., 2004-06-13, female