The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
Home Page Search
LoginNC Biodiversity Project

North Carolina's 187 Odonate species

Sort Species by: Family   Scientific Name       [ Undocumented ]
Related Species in CORDULEGASTRIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 1

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
[View PDF]
Tiger Spiketail (Cordulegaster erronea) by Ted Wilcox
Compare with: Twin-spotted Spiketail   Arrowhead Spiketail   Brown Spiketail  
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

[Google images]
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Tiger Spiketail
distribution Widely scattered across the mountains, foothills, and the northern third of the Piedmont. Presence in the southeastern half of the Piedmont is uncertain, though there are no records between Rutherford and Wake counties.
abundance Uncommon in the Piedmont foothills, but rare in the true mountains and eastward in the Piedmont toward the Fall Line. Dunkle (2000) calls it "local" throughout its range, Paulson (2011) calls it "rather rare" over its range, and Beaton (2007) says "Uncommon to rare and local" in GA.
flight The flights in the mountains and Piedmont are roughly similar -- late May into early September. However, it is most frequent in July and in the first half of August.
habitat Small streams or seeps, without fish; in partial shade. Streams may be rocky, but may have a sandy substrate.
behavior Males cruise in the vicinity of the seeps, though they can be difficult to find when perched. The males are more active late in the day, and may fly and perch well away from seeps, often on a twig or stem just one to several feet off the ground, for easy viewing.
comments For whatever reason, Duncan Cuyler had relatively few numbers of collected specimens and county records, as compared with the gratifyingly large number of recent records, especially those documented with photos. Photos have now been taken in ten counties, both in the mountains and in the far northern Piedmont. These data seem to indicate that the Tiger Spiketail may be increasing in numbers in recent decades, though it might simply be that the species is not a difficult one to photograph. Because of this increase in recent records, the NC Natural Heritage Program removed it from the Watch List in fall 2014.
state_status
S_rank S3S4
fed_status
G_rank G4
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Tiger Spiketail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: B. Bockhahn

Comment: Transylvania, 2019-05-28, Gorges State Park
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Alleghany, 2017-08-04, Stone Mountain State Park. Seep and boggy area near campground Loop B. - 2 males, 1 ovipositing female. Photo is of female.
Photo by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin

Comment: Yancey, 2017-07-14, Three individuals were observed in a small woodland stream and seepage complex near Spivey Gap.
Photo by: Timothy Deering

Comment: Buncombe, 2016-05-24, Alexander.Flew into neighbor
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Alleghany, 2015-07-14, Stone Mountain State Park (STMO). Seep and boggy area near campground Loop B. - Male. Long patrols of the seep, passing over a given area every few minutes. Low-light flight photo taken.
Photo by: M. Griffin

Comment: Stokes, 2015-06-06, HARO - Female found on Riverbluffs Trail. @ ,
Photo by: Owen McConnell

Comment: Graham, 2014-09-02, at a tiny branch of Squally Creek
Photo by: Bob Cherry

Comment: Jackson, 2012-07-16, Blue Ridge Parkway
Photo by: Jeff Beane

Comment: Rutherford; P, 2012-06-09, Union Mills - Box Creek SNHA - female - ID by JEC
Photo by: Jeff Beane

Comment: Rutherford; P, 2012-06-09, Union Mills - Box Creek SNHA - female - ID by JEC
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2011-08-16, Richmond Hill Park, N Asheville
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2011-08-16, Richmond Hill Park, N Asheville
Photo by: Beth Brinson

Comment: Rockingham, 2011-08-07, MARI
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2011-07-30, Richmond Hill Park, near small stream
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2011-07-22, finally had to catch it get a pic. Habitat matches desrciption perfectly
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2011-07-22, finally had to catch it get a pic. Habitat matches desrciption perfectly
Photo by: Beth Brinson

Comment: Surry, 2009-08-08, PIMO
Photo by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: Wilkes; P, 2007-08-07, male
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2011-07-30, Richmond Hill Park