Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Eratoneura comoides - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note orange coloration

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- note interconnected wing
pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- note
interconnected wing pattern
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A reddish-orange species with a bold zigzag pattern on the wings and body. The top of the head has two parallel orange submedial lines, often with a lateral ranch (resulting in the appearance of a white spot on the side of each line); the midline is pale. The pronotum has a Y or V-shaped orange/red mark and concolorous bars on the lateral margins. The scutellum has reddish-orange lateral triangles, connected in a point at the scutellal base. The large white wing patches below the scutellum are noticeably divided rather than connected to form a single white spot, characteristic of this species. The wing pattern is interconnected, with all wing markings touching other wing markings. Adults are 2.8- 3.0 mm long. (3I)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Southeastern United States, from Mississippi to North Carolina; previously only known as far north as Georgia, perhaps climate change is expanding this species northward. (3I)
Abundance: Recorded from a handful of counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, where is is uncommon; probably more abundant in the right habitat, especially in these two regions.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found near mixed hardwood forest habitat.
Plant Associates: Oak: Quercus nigra, Quercus phellos, Quercus pagoda (3I)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is similar in appearance to many of the Erythroneura species "with interconnected orange lines." All have interconnected orange wing markings, however there are differences in the pattern and the markings themselves. The prominent white patch below the scutellum, surrounded by orange, is clearly divided, with the orange usually lining the entire inner margin of the wing in E. comoides; in the Erythroneura group, this white patch is largely circular, with no orange lining the inner margin of the wings. Additionally, the orange mark that is inside the white "diamond" shape near the tip of the wings is shaped like an downwards facing arrow, being noticeably long and pointed and extending up into the top white patch in E. comoides, and shaped like a squat trapezoid in the Erythroneura group. The orange submedial lines on the vertex tend to have a distinct branch extending outwards (gives the impression of a white spot on each side of the line) while the Erythroneura group tends to lack these branches. And finally, the pattern itself is typically much more bold and a vibrant orange in E. comoides.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Eratoneura comoides No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf, Patrick Coin
Halifax Co.
Comment: grassy area and mixed hardwood forest edge near pine forest
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn, L. Amos
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn, L. Amos
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Gates Co.
Comment: open, grassy area near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment: