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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

North Carolina's 187 Odonate species
Sort by: Family (Taxonomic) Scientific Name
 
Related Species in GOMPHIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Two-striped Forceptail by Mark Shields
Identification Tips: reveal Identification Tips by moving cursor over the image.
Compare with: Russet-tipped Clubtail   Southeastern Spinyleg  
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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sciName Aphylla williamsoni
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Two-striped Forceptail
distribution Formerly (prior to 2005), mainly just the lower half of the Coastal Plain. However, in the past handful of years the range is expanding westward rapidly, west currently to Lincoln County. Thus, now it is scattered over nearly all of the Coastal Plain and the southeastern Piedmont. Beaton (2007) states that in GA it is "rare above [the Fall Line] but expanding into the middle Piedmont". It is certainly expanding its range inland (westward) in NC, as well; Cuyler never collected the species farther west than Pitt and Pender counties.
abundance Clearly increasing in recent years. Formerly scarce (rare to uncommon) and limited almost solely to the Tidewater counties. Now it occurs essentially throughout the Coastal Plain and southeastern Piedmont, where rare to uncommon and a bit local, but formerly it was nearly absent in these areas. In fact, the species has been recorded now (2018) at a handful of lakes and ponds in Wake County alone, and two of our highest three one-day counts have been in Union County.
flight In the Coastal Plain, present from mid-June to early September. The now many records from the Piedmont fall from late June to early September.
habitat Vicinity of ponds and lakes, as well as canals, especially muck- or peat-bottom ones. These waters can be somewhat disturbed and not "high-quality".
behavior May perch on the ground near a pond, or on vegetation around a pond. Most often seen at ponds and small lakes.
comments Because Cuyler never collected the species in NC farther inland than Hertford, Bertie, and Pitt counties, we assume that these farther western records represent a recent inland expansion of the range. The range is still spotty, in that there are a number of Wake County records but very few from the Sandhills or the adjacent counties to the east (e.g., Bladen, Robeson, Sampson, etc.).
state_status
S_rank S3
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Two-striped Forceptail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt.

Comment: Pender, 2018-08-25, Along Northeast Cape Fear River at Holly Shelter Boating Access. - Female.
Photo by: Robert Gilson

Comment: Mecklenburg, 2018-07-04, Chris Talkington
Photo by: Robert Gilson

Comment: Mecklenburg, 2018-07-04, Chris Talkington
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Edgecombe, 2017-08-04, Tarboro, NC; Etheridge Pond; 35.8699, -77.5279 - ad.male
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Lenoir, 2017-08-01, Neuseway Nature Park, Kinston
Photo by: Conrad Wernett

Comment: Lee, 2017-07-29, - Watson Lake in Broadway
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Onslow, 2017-07-14, New River, from confluence of Blue Creek to 6 km upstream, by kayak - most were perched in mats of alligator weed. First record for county.
Photo by: George Andrews

Comment: Lincoln, 2017-07-12, Catawba River, 1.25 miles south of Cowan\'s Ford Dam, west bank - Female, plucked from river
Photo by: George Andrews

Comment: Lincoln, 2017-07-12, Catawba River, 1.25 miles south of Cowan\'s Ford Dam, west bank - Female, plucked from river
Photo by: Conrad Wernett

Comment: New Hanover, 2016-09-04, - Male along the shores of Sutton Lake.
Photo by: Alicia Jackson

Comment: Brunswick, 2016-07-19, Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point
Photo by: Conrad Wernett, Alyssa Wernett

Comment: Wayne, 2016-07-17, - Male spotted at Cliffs of the Neuse state park
Photo by: Alicia Jackson

Comment: Brunswick, 2016-06-28, Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point
Photo by: Alicia Jackson

Comment: Brunswick, 2016-06-28, Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point
Photo by: Salman Abdulali

Comment: Pitt, 2015-06-30, River Park North
Photo by: George Andrews

Comment: Union, 2014-07-16, Cane Creek Park lake - Pic of obelisking male
Photo by: F. Williams, S. Williams

Comment: Gates, 2014-07-13, MEMI
Photo by: F. Williams, S. Williams

Comment: Gates, 2014-07-13, MEMI
Photo by: George Andrews

Comment: Union, 2014-06-30, Cane Creek Park lake - Lakeside at power line clearing.
Photo by: George Andrews

Comment: Union, 2013-09-02, - Marsh NE area of lake.
Photo by: George Andrews

Comment: Union, 2013-09-02, - Marsh NE area of lake.
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Wake, 2013-09-02, Yates Mill County Park - male
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Wake, 2012-08-26, Yates Mill County Park - female
Photo by: Bob Oberfelder

Comment: Wake, 2011-07-22, A single specimen was observed at Lochmere golf course in cary
Photo by: Lafferty

Comment: Brunswick, 2009-09-01,
Photo by: E. Corey

Comment: Columbus, 2009-08-05, White Marsh Wildlife Action Camp - male