The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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North Carolina's 187 Odonate species
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Related Species in COENAGRIONIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

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Aurora Damsel (Chromagrion conditum) by John Petranka
Compare with:   Distinctive
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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mapClick on county for list of all its records for Aurora Damsel
distribution Throughout the mountains; scattered over most of the Piedmont, though possibly absent in the extreme southeastern counties. Absent from the Coastal Plain.
abundance Fairly common in the mountains, at least locally. Rare over most of the Piedmont, but apparently uncommon in the foothills. Possibly absent in a few counties in the southeastern Piedmont. The highest counts are from the mountains and foothills.
flight The mountain flight is from early May to mid-August, wheras the Piedmont flight is from late April to mid-June. However, there is no reason the flight in the Piedmont should be narrower than that in the mountains, and it likely flies throughout July and into August.
habitat Still waters of pools/ponds -- such as beaver ponds, bogs, seeps, and slow streams. Not often found far from water.
behavior
comments There are relatively few recent records from the Piedmont, especially the southern half of the Piedmont. Does this indicate a recent decline? The species should be easily identified, at least with photographs.
state_status
S_rank S4?
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Aurora Damsel

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: Mark Shields, John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Jackson, 2018-06-26, Panthertown Valley, Nantahala National Forest - in bog and along Panthertown Creek. First record for county.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel

Comment: Yancey, 2018-06-17, - vegetated area on edge of small pond
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Clay, 2018-05-12, Beaver pond Buck Creek Road - Male, Female, teneral
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Madison, 2018-05-09, River Road north of Hot Springs - Male
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Alleghany, 2017-06-28, Little Glade Mill Pond, Blue Ridge Parkway
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Transylvania, 2017-05-03, Lake Imaging, Dupont State Forest. - Male.
Photo by: Owen McConnell

Comment: Graham, 2016-06-12, New County Record - Tulula Wetlands, pond #8
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2015-06-02, Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Virginia Senechal

Comment: Henderson, 2013-06-20, Fletcher Park, Fletcher NC - Male
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2012-05-25, Owen Park ponds, Warren Wilson College,Swannanoa River - Male
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Gail Lankford, Janie Owen

Comment: Madison, 2012-05-17, French Broad River, Pisgah National Forest - Female
Photo by: Jeff Beane

Comment: Wilkes; P, 2011-05-11, 6.25 mi. ESE Moravian Falls, ?Hartness Bog?
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2010-05-28, Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area - male and female
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2010-05-26, Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area - 2 pairs in wheel
Photo by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: immature male, 2006-05-27
Photo by: Ted WIlcox

Comment: female, 2005-05-26
Photo by: Ted Wilcox

Comment: male, 2004-06-09