Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Texananus longipennis - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- female; note pregenital
sternite shape

© Kyle Kittelberger- male; note subgenital plates
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A large brownish species, with adults 9.0-10.0 mm long. The entire body and wings have a dense reticulated mesh-like dark brown pattern, extending onto the face. The vertex has a bold white tip, in front of a broken black band between the eyes. The female pregenital sternite has a narrow medial notch that extends between a third to a half of the way inwards; the posterior sides of the notch extend outwards slightly, with the posterior margin of the sternite weakly concave towards the lateral sides. The pregenital sternite is brownish with a somewhat broad blackish coloration near the notch, decreasing in width the closer to the anterior edge of this sternite. The male subgenital plates are relatively close to one another, with a slight gap between them; together, they are triangular in shape, with slightly rounded lateral (rather than straight) margins near the base. For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Primarily Southeastern United States
Abundance: Recorded from both the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, can be locally common; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Open grassy, brushy areas, open woodland
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: The three species of Texananus in the subgenus Iowanus that have been recorded in North Carolina are: caducus, longipennis, and majestus. These three species all visually resemble one another and therefore specimens in this subgenus can only conclusively be identified to species with a very clear, unobstructed view of the underside; the female pregenital sternite is quite distinctive among these three species, the male plates less so.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Texananus longipennis No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female; ~9.3 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female; ~9.3 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: female; ~9.3 mm long
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: females
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: females
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: males
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: Caught off moth sheet and chilled to get underside photos.
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: Caught off moth sheet and chilled to get underside photos.
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: Caught off moth sheet and chilled to get underside photos.
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: female came to lights.
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: female came to lights.