Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Osbornellus clarus - No Common Name



© Ken Childs- note pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- note pattern

© Paul Scharf
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A medium-sized leafhopper that is typically brownish. This species has a characteristic bold, dark mottled pattern on the wings, contrasting with large white spots in the middle, and a bold black and orange pattern on the head. Additionally, there is a bold prominent white triangle on the apex of the head. The pronotum has a pale grayish median line, and there are white spots along the anterior edge. The scutellum has two dark brown triangles in the anterior corners; otherwise, the scutellum is mostly yellowish white. The wing venation is dark, and the legs are yellowish. The female pregenital sternite is roundedly produced, while each male plates has a long and slender attenuated apex. Adults are around 5.0-5.5 mm long. (Beamer 1937), (DeLong 1948)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Primarily eastern North America
Abundance: Uncommon; scattered records throughout the state.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Mixed to open forest habitat; where herbaceous vegetation is.
Plant Associates: Herbaceous plants
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is very similar to O. consors and in fact many individuals of O. consors were misidentified as O. clarus for years online. The two species can be somewhat easily distinguished, as consors is relatively uniformly brown overall while clarus is typically darker, with a distinctly marked and bold mottled pattern on the wings with a row of bold white spots down the middle. The vertex of clarus is also much more boldly patterned than consors, with a distinct white triangle on the apex; in consors, this spot is not as boldly white and does not stand out amongst the rest of the vertex color. The two species of course differ in terms of genitalia.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Osbornellus clarus No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light. IAW Bugguide: The eastern species with a mottled head. Note that the wing tips have rectangular anteapical cells, not the twisted ones of Scaphoideus
Photo by:
Out of state Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light. Blue Ridge Mts, Patrick County, Virginia
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Durham Co.
Comment: ENRI
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted To Light
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: on sheet - unid_leafhopper
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Durham Co.
Comment: ENRI
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights - unid_leafhopper
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights - unid_leafhopper
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping. Grassy, weedy area near hardwoods.