Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Cyrtolobus gramatanus - No Common Name



© Matt Wallace- male

© Matt Wallace- female

© Ken Childs- male, tentative

© Ken Childs- tentative
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: Smiliinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: Brownish in coloration with pale, whitish transverse bands; these bands are sometimes broken up, as in the case of the female. The tips of the wings have a blackish smudge and the legs are pale, yellowish in color. The front of the pronotum can be mottled in appearance.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Primarily a midwestern species that is perhaps gradually expanding into the eastern United States; two recent eastern records, this one from NC and one from TN.
Abundance: One record, from the upper Piedmont.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Mixed hardwood forest
Plant Associates: Probably Quercus (oak)
Behavior: To listen to the male courtship call for this genus, listen here. These courtship calls are not audible to the human ear, and the calls here are produced by recording the substrate vibrations that the treehoppers use to communicate through the plants themselves. The recorded call is then amplified so that it is now audible to human ears. Research has shown that treehoppers use vibrations to attract mates, to announce the discovery of a good feeding site, or to alert a defending mother to the approach of a predator (T.IM) .
Comment: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Cyrtolobus gramatanus No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: M. Rothschild: "I believe this might be a male Cyrtolobus gramatanus. It is primarily a midwestern species but I think it does get into western TN. I've collected it fairly extensively in AR, IL, IN, MO, and OH over the last few years."
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: M. Rothschild: "I believe this might be a male Cyrtolobus gramatanus. It is primarily a midwestern species but I think it does get into western TN. I've collected it fairly extensively in AR, IL, IN, MO, and OH over the last few years."
Photo by: Matt Wallace
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Matt Wallace
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Surry Co.
Comment: PIMO