Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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Cicadellidae Members: NC Records

Paraphlepsius eburneolus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- paler individual
Taxonomy
Family: CicadellidaeSubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A very distinctive species with a pale, orange-tan head and thorax which contrasts with the [typically] very dark, blackish wings; in some individuals, the wings can be a paler color, more grayish than the bold black color characteristic of this species. There are some bold white spots on the lateral margins of the scutellum. The crown is produced but somewhat rounded and similarly long across its width; it is sharply angled to the face. The female pregenital sternite has a median notch on the posterior margin, with rounded lateral lobes; overall, the sternite is dark, with blackish sections on either side of the median notch. The male subgenital plates are short and triangular. Adult males are 5.0-5.6 mm long, females are 5.1-5.9 mm. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern and central North America
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, infrequently encountered; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found near mixed hardwood forest, mixed hardwood-pine forest.
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: NOTE: This species externally resembles P. fulvidorsum and P. collitus, with dark wings and a pale, tan thorax and head. However, note that fulvidorsum has a strongly produced crown that is noticeably longer and pointed; the crowns in the other two species are more rounded and not as long, with eburneolus showing a moderately long point. Additionally, eburneolus tends to have much darker wings than fulvidorsum (though not always) while collitus tends to have paler wings. The pregenital sternites for each species are very distinctive.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Paraphlepsius eburneolus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens
Photo by: R. Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: IV light
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment: The site is a mixed hardwood-pine forest at 2200'.
Photo by: Jim Petranka
Madison Co.
Comment: The site is a mixed hardwood-pine forest at 2200\'.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; 5.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; 5.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; 5.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; 5.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; 5.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: female; 5.8 mm