Hoppers of North Carolina:
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Cicadellidae Members: NC Records

Chlorotettix melanotus - No Common Name



© Ken Childs

© Ken Childs

© Ken Childs- note dark bluish-black color

© Paul Scharf
Taxonomy
Family: CicadellidaeSubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A somewhat dark species, described as appearing black but in reality being dark green. The eyes are blackish, and the pronotum has a large black spot behind each eye. The wings have smokey costal margins and apexes. Adults are around 7.5 mm in length. This species is described as "resembling tergatus so closely in coloration and structural characters that the two can scarcely be distinguished by external characters. Usually melanotus is darker in color" (DeLong 1948). However, the male plates of melanotus are a little broader at the tip and more strongly rounded. (DeLong 1918)

The photographic records here are tentative and are placed here because of how dark the individuals are. These individuals are bluish-black with black eyes, concolorous wings and body, and yellow legs and face. The costal margin of the wings is also yellowish.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern and central United States, rarely encountered.
Abundance: Recorded from a couple counties in the Piedmont, uncommon to rare; likely under collected and therefore under reported.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Wet meadows and grassy areas; sometimes a hillside species
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: NOTE: Chlorotettix is a notriously difficult genus to identify to species visually; a majority of the species are various shade of yellow and green, and they can only be reliably distinguished by looking at genital features. Therefore, it is very important for all Chlorotettix species other than necopinus and tergatus to obtain a picture of the underside.

Until specimens can be obtained for the bluish-black individuals, records are tentative.

Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Chlorotettix melanotus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Britta Muiznieks
Dare Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Britta Muiznieks
Dare Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Britta Muiznieks
Dare Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: 8 mm
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: