Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Paraphlepsius tennessus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- note female
pregenital sternite shape: }
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A brownish species with a highly mottled thorax, head, and wings. The crown is slightly produced (fairly rounded, slightly pointy), angled to the face. The pronotum has a somewhat dark anterior half, contrasting with the fairly pale posterior half. The female pregenital sternite has a small separation/notch in the middle, and the sternite then curves in a concave manner towards rounded outer corners of the sternite; there is a well defined black band following each concave edge from the notch to the rounded corners. More simply, the pregenital sternite looks like a curly bracket or } with a black border. Adults are typically larger than other members of this genus; males are 6.1-7.4 mm long, while females are 6.1-8.9 mm long. (Hamilton 1975)

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: A common and widespread species, found throughout the eastern United States, west to the Southwest (Hamilton 1975)
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, uncommon to locally common.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in mixed hardwood forest and open woodlands.
Plant Associates: Recorded from Helianthus and Salix (DL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species externally resembles several other Paraphlepsius, especially within the subgenus Gamarex. The size and genital characteristics, such as female pregential sternite, are key characteristics to differentiating this species from others.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Paraphlepsius tennessus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: open grassy area within mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: female, 8 mm
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: female, 8 mm