Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Scaphoideus incisus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note color

© Kyle Kittelberger- note dorsal pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph, note coloration
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A brownish species overall, with a white crown that has a thin brown marginal line. There is a transvere orange-brown { shaped band between the eyes, with the brownish coloration not quite reaching the base of the crown, leaving a pale whitish area before the pronotum. The pronotum is a reddish-brown to orange color with a T-shaped grayish-blue mark; the base of the pronotum also has a thin grayish-blue transverse band. The anterior half or more of the scutellum is orange while the rest is white. The wings are light brown with darker brown venation and some paler and darker patches in the wing cells. The face is is fairly pale, as is the underside of the thorax and abdomen; the female pregenital sternite is a light brown color, lacking the bold dark medial areas that other species have; the posterior medial notch may be deep, moderate, or not present at all, and overall this sternite is variable among individuals. Male plates are also brownish. Adult males are 5.1-5.7 mm long, while females are 5.1-6.2 mm. (Barnett 1976)

The nymphs are very strikingly bicolored- the abdomen is a yellowish to white color, with a small orange to black tip with some small black dots near the hairy 'bristles'. The thorax is black, and the head has a pale tip, appearing very white in some individuals. The face is white and the legs are bicolored with a dark base.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: A widespread species in the Eastern United States, not found in adjacent Canada (BG)
Abundance: Recorded recently from several counties in the Piedmont, also found in the mountains; likely more abundant across the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
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Jun
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Oct
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Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Woodland openings, areas with herbaceous woodland vegetation, forest edge, etc.
Plant Associates: Milkweed, Vitis spp., Prunus virginiana, Carpinus caroliniara, other herbaceous woodland vegetation (Barnett 1976)
Behavior: Adults can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment:
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Scaphoideus incisus No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: NYMPH, Caught sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: NYMPH, Caught sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills habitat, brushy
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills habitat, brushy
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Moore Co.
Comment: sandhills habitat, brushy; nymph with a dryad sac
Photo by: Bryan England
Wake Co.
Comment: Noticed nymphs on some nursery-grown, recently planted milkweed, but "wild" common milkweed was abundant nearby. Uncertain whether nymphs arrived with the recent plantings (as eggs?) or were already present at site on wild milkweed or other plants.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: male; 4.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: male; 4.8 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: male; 4.8 mm
Photo by:
Orange Co.
Comment: recently emerged adult; https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26305038