Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Joruma pisca - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- male; note male genitalia
and red under wings, as well as amber wings

© Kyle Kittelberger- female
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A small species that appears long and slender. This species looks dark, almost black overall, but in reality only the pronotum and head are dark; the wings are actually amber colored, but due to the dark abdomen, when the wings are down on the body, they appear blackish. When viewed from above, the eyes are darker than the head, and the face is a reddish color. The underside of the body is yellowish, ad the legs are a pale yellow color. The body is red near the wing bases (visible when the wings are raised), the abdomen has an orange tint on the top, and some specimens are reported to have red on the back as well. Males have characteristic genitalia with long, straight male subgenital plates covered with a comb of long setae. Females have a somewhat triangular pregenital sternite with a thin slit in the middle. (BG)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: An uncommon to rare species that has been infrequently encountered; Andy Hamilton notes that he has never collected this species, and it is not in his collection, nor has he seen it in any other collection. The only recent records are from North Carolina.
Abundance: Recorded recently from several counties in the mountains and Piedmont; could possibly show up anywhere in the state, but not much is known about this species.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy habitat amid montane forest, as well as in mixed hardwood forest.
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This genus is primarily Neotropical, with only two speies known from the United States; J. pisca is the most widespread and common of these two species (Young, 1952).
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Joruma pisca No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area amid montane forest; many present, pics represent two individuals
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area amid montane forest; many present, pics represent two individuals
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area amid montane forest; many present, pics represent two individuals
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area amid montane forest; many present, pics represent two individuals
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area amid montane forest; many present, pics represent two individuals
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, open area amid montane forest; many present, pics represent two individuals
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Surry Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Surry Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: