Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Paraphlepsius collitus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note coloration

© Kyle Kittelberger- note pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A mottled species with dark, densely retiulate wings with many pale, white spots. These spots form very indistinct pale diagonal bands. The scutellum, pronotum, and head are yellowish, contrasting sharply with the dark wings; in some individuals, the pronotum has dark brown mottling but the yellowish base is still present and visible. The crown is broadly rounded and not strongly produced, weakly angled to the face. The female pregenital sternite has lobed lateral margins; the posterior margin is } shaped, with a median projection that has a slit in the middle. The concave margins to the side of the median projection have a dark border. The male subgenital plates are triangular, with rounded lateral margins. Males are 4.8-5.8 mm long, while females are 4.9-6.4 mm long (Hamilton 1975).

For diagrams of this species, see: Dmitriev. For additional images of this species, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Common throughout North America east of the Rocky Mountains (Hamilton 1975).
Abundance: A somewhat common species with scattered records across the state in all three regions; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy areas and forest edge; also mixed hardwood forest and open woodlands.
Plant Associates: Has been found on sweetgum.
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a black light.
Comment: NOTE: This species externally resembles P. eburneolus and P. fulvidorsum, with dark wings and a pale, tan thorax and head. However, note that fulvidorsum has a strongly produced crown that is noticeably pointed; the crowns in the other two species are more rounded and not as long. Additionally, eburneolus tends to have much darker wings than fulvidorsum while collitus tends to have paler wings.
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Paraphlepsius collitus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf, Patrick Coin
Halifax Co.
Comment: grassy area and mixed hardwood forest edge near pine forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Bockhahn, Scharf
Burke Co.
Comment: LAJA - 2014 BioBlitz Attrcted to Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm; male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm; male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm; male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Cumberland Co.
Comment: 5.3 mm; male
Photo by: Amanda Auxier
Pender Co.
Comment: Attracted to white CFL porch light in semi-wooded residential area.