Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Sophonia orientalis - Two-spotted Leafhopper



© Kyle Kittelberger- note color and pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Mark Shields

© Ken Kneidel- nymph, note head shape
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Evacanthinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: An unmistakable species, nothing else in our fauna can be confused with it. Adults are yellowish with a bold dark brown to black longitudinal stripe, sometimes bordered by red, down the center of the wings along the commissure. There are two bold black "eye" spots at the apex of each wing, where there is some rufous color present. The middorsal stripe splits into two thin, parallel bands on the head and ends at a prominent black spot at the apex of the head. Nymphs are uniformly green or light-yellow and have a shovel-shaped nose, as well as a pair of small black spots at the rear end of the abdomen (CABI).
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Native to southern Asia, it was introduced in North America where it was first recorded in California in 1996. It has since spread across the southern portions of the country, from California east to North Carolina and Virginia. (BG)
Abundance: Recorded recently from a few counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, likely a recent arrival in the state and probably more abundant elsewhere as this species is expanding its range.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in a variety of habitats, though studies have shown this species has a preference for wetter, closed habitats rather than drier, open ones (CABI).
Plant Associates: Extremely polyphagous, this species attacks more than 300 plant species in over 83 families; resident breeding populations have been recently discovered in ornamental, vegetable, and fruit crops in California (BG). For a larger list of host plants, see: PKB.
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light. Adults and nymphs have been found to be present throughout most of the year, suggesting several annual generations (BG).
Comment: This species can have a variety of negative impacts on host plants. It produces, as a result of feeding, interveinal chlorosis and vein browning that can eventually lead to the death of affected leaves. It also decreases stem length and diameter, the number of nodes, leaf area and net carbon dioxide assimilation. Furthermore, oviposition can kill off distal leaf tissue by interrupting the flow of water and nutrients in the plant. (CABI)
Status: Introduced
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Sophonia orientalis Two-spotted Leafhopper

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4.8 mm, sweep of vegetation around wet retention area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Underside of Magnolia leaf; an adult was on another.
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment: