Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Anoscopus serratulae - No Common Name



© Paul Scharf- male, side view

© Paul Scharf- male, top view

© Paul Scharf- female, top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- nymph
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Aphrodinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A strongly sexually dimorphic species. Males of this species have light-colored, tan wings with two to three dark brown to black crossbands. Females are brownish overall and lack the distinct dark bands though can show black markings on the wings and rest of the body. Adults have black eyes and dark (bicolored) legs. Females are larger than males, with males 3.3-3.8 mm long and females 4.1-4.6 mm (Hamilton 1975). Nymphs are bicolored, being a mostly creamy color with dark brown outer margins and a broad brown mark down the midline of the head.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Adventive in North America, native to Europe; has been recorded across the United States from coast to coast and into Canada. Though more of a northern species, it makes its way into the Southeast at least as far as North Carolina. (Hamilton 1975)
Abundance: Uncommon to rare; recorded from several counties in the mountains (where it is likely found throughout) and one county in the Piedmont, probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Grassy areas
Plant Associates: In Europe, host plants are grasses like Elymus repens, Dactylis glomerata, Holcus spp. and Festuca rubra (BG).
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: Nymphs live at the root crowns of grasses and are seldom seen. (BG)

This species was first recorded in north America from New Jersey on June 29, 1897. (Hamilton 1975)

Status: Introduced
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Anoscopus serratulae No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught while sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught while sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Yancey Co.
Comment: Female, attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Yancey Co.
Comment: Female, attracted to Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: nymph; NCSU specimen
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: nymph; NCSU specimen
Photo by: J. B. Sullivan
Yancey Co.
Comment: female