Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Agallia quadripunctata - Four-spotted Clover Leafhopper



© Kyle Kittelberger- note small wings

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- probable female

© Paul Scharf- probable male
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Megophthalminae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: This species is stout and robust in appearance and has short wings that are wider than those in the very common A. constricta: short and wide vs. long and slender. Adults range in color from light brown to fuscous to dark brown (but not necessarily black) with pale wing venation; males are much darker than females. There are four spots on the front of the body: two on the head and two dark ones on the pronotum (BG). Individuals have variable body color, ranging from light to dark brown. Adults are 3 to 4 mm long and 1.5 mm wide. The female pregenital sternite is truncate without any emarginations. The male plates are small and acutely angled, with convex lateral margins. Nymphs are dark, a combination of black and white, and they have small 'ear-tufts' above the eyes characteristic of Agallia nymphs. (DeLong 1948), (Oman 1933)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Found throughout North America; the most widespread Agallia in the country, ranging from coast to cast (though a higher density seem to occur in the eastern United States.
Abundance: Primarily recorded from the mountains, plus several counties in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Likely more abundant, at least in the mountains, in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
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Jul
Aug
Sep
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Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Grassy, brushy field-type habitat, including weedy areas and agricultural fields (BG).
Plant Associates: Usually on legumes, like clover, and has been found on Liliaceae. Also recorded from Asclepias and Rubus (DL).
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is usually parthenogenetic, and males are uncommon to rare to find in this species; they are known usually from the spring, sometimes into the summer.

There is a similar looking but poorly known and infrequently encountered species, Agallia obesa, that could be confused with A. quadripunctata. This species has not been recorded in North Carolina yet and is presently only known from the Deep South, but could theoretically show up in areas liket he southwestern Piedmont. It has four large, dark spots on the head and pronotum (as in quadripunctata), but is much smaller, being 2.5-2.75 mm long. See Oman 1933 for more information and diagrams.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Agallia quadripunctata Four-spotted Clover Leafhopper

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping short lawn grass
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping short lawn grass
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: The wings appear short. This could be a result of the photo angle. However, this specimen lacks pronotal spots; A. quadripunctata always has pronotal spots
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Mitchell Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy vegetation in the open on the top of the mountain; the bald
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Mitchell Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy vegetation in the open on the top of the mountain; the bald
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy area on mixed forest edge
Photo by: F. Williams, S. Williams
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: Amanda Auxier
Pender Co.
Comment: