Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Acinopterus acuminatus - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view; note pointed
wingtip

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- a darker
individual
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A species with distinctive pointed wing tips and a dark overall color, with wings darker than the head and body (BG). Length is roughly 5.0-7.0 mm. When viewed from above, the head is distinctly narrower than the pronotum and the body bulges out near the pronotum before tapering at the wingtips, shaped almost like an upside down slender tear drop. The vertex (head) and pronotum are brownish to olive-green in color while the wings are typically dark brown in color, sometimes with a blue hue. Some cells, typically closer to the wing edge, may be darker than the rest of the wing, almost black in color, while other cells can be whitish. The legs are a similar greenish color to the face, except for the hindlegs which are bicolored with a dark brown base. (Lawson 1920) Nymphs are greenish overall.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Largely southern and eastern in its distribution, ranging west to at least Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas (Lawson 1920).
Abundance: Uncommon, with scattered records across the Piedmont and Coastal Plain; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
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Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Grassy, brushy, field-type habitats and forest edge (near grass).
Plant Associates: Grasses, Wild Geranium, Amphiachyris and Tetraneuris species (daisies) (Lawson 1920).
Behavior:
Comment: While A. acuminatus is the common and widespread member of this genus in the East, there is another species, A. angulatus, that could potentially be encountered. It is primarily a Southwestern U.S. species, but there are a couple records from the Southeast from FL and DC. It is a reddish color overall, lacking dark coloration; supposedly the wing tips are more blunt too, not as pointed.
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Acinopterus acuminatus No Common Name

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Halifax Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Halifax Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Halifax Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Halifax Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Vance Co.
Comment: Field/forest edge
Photo by: B. Bockhahn
Harnett Co.
Comment: CACR
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Weedy area near a hardwoods.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.9mm, collected from sweep in overgrown retention area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.9mm, collected from sweep in overgrown retention area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.9mm, collected from sweep in overgrown retention area