Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Hymetta anthisma - No Common Name



© Ken Childs- nominate form

© Ken Childs- nominate form

© Ken Childs- var. 'distincta'

© Rob Van Epps- var. 'distincta'; note x-band #1
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A boldly patterned species that can vary in darkness, coloration, and pattern. Adults have a pale yellowish-white body; the head and pronotum are largely a pale white color, sometimes with dull sanguineous spots present. The wings have a whitish base color, with three crossbands (see comments section below for crossband info). The first crossband is at most slightly narrowed along the costal margin. Crossband 3, the oblique dark band, is typically distinct. There is a transverse band at the apex of the wings (between crossband 3) that is at most indistinct; usually it is not present. There are two forms in this species.

- The first, nominate form is characterized by many red dots scattered across all of the wings, including on top of the brown crossband, leading up to the transverse band near the wingtip. These dots can be large and are a brighter red; there are typically numerous spots, in some individuals the speckling can be quite dense. Crossband #1 is a brilliant red and crossband #3 is more smoky than black; the second crossband is orange and quite distinct. The posterior margin of crossband 1 projects toward the wing tips, extending outwards past the dark spot near the claval suture of each wing.

- Form 'distincta' has the red dots restricted largely to the base of the wings, before and across crossband #1; the rest of the wing is mostly white with a small number of dots. Crossband #1 tends to be very broad. More importantly, the posterior margin of the crossband extends essentially straight across the wing from the costal margin to the black dot; it does not project past the black spot. Crossband #2 is obsolete; it is not present. Crossband #3 is typically absent, but if present it is indistinct. There is also a dusky transverse band between crossband 3, across the apex of the wing.

Adults are 3.3-3.6 mm long. For more pics of this species, see: BG. (Fairbairn, 1928)

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Central and eastern United States (3I)
Abundance: Scattered records across the Piedmont and mountains; likely more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in mixed hardwood forest and forest edge.
Plant Associates: Cercis canadensis, Vitis spp. (3I)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment:

H. anthisma could be confused with H. balteata. The nominate form of balteata resembles form 'distincta' of H. anthisma, as both have a similar color pattern, especially with the lack of crossband #2 and relatively low reddish wing speckling. However, the best way to distinguish the two is by looking at crossband #1. In balteata, the posterior margin of crossband 1 projects toward the rear of the wings, noticeably extending past the black spot on the claval suture of each wing. In anthisma var. 'distincta', the posterior margin of the crossband extends essentially straight across the wing from the costal margin to the black dot; it does not project past the black spot.

- Form 'mediana' of balteata also resembles the nominate form of H. anthisma. In anthisma, crossband #1 is a brilliant red and crossband #3 is more smoky than black; in 'mediana' crossband #1 is a dark red to faded brown, and crossband #3 is dusky to black. Additionally, 'mediana' is supposed to have darker red dots than anthisma. However, anthisma has larger, brighter red, and more numerous spots; in some individuals, the speckling can be quite dense.

(Fairbairn, 1928)

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Hymetta anthisma No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Burke Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Open area near woods. Attracted to black light.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Open area near woods. Attracted to black light.
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: var. distincta
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: var. distincta
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: var. distincta
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: var. distincta
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: var. distincta
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Durham Co.
Comment: ENRI
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Transylvania Co.
Comment: