Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Erasmoneura vulnerata - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- red
individual
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A dark leafhopper with a reddish-brown color pattern, sometimes with a brighter red or green hue. The extensive brown patches on the wings and head are characteristic of this species; the brown color sort of resembles the color of dried-blood (hence 'vulnerata') (BG). Some individuals however have very vibrant red wings and sometimes a red head and thorax. There are small pale spots on the side of an otherwise dark head with a pale midline; these pale spots resemble white stripes next to the eyes. The pronotum and mesonotum are also mostly dark, and the anteclypeus is brown or black. There is a white patch on the costal margin of the wings, and the wing tips are a dark brown. The underside of the thorax (the mesosternum to be exact) is dark, the rest is pale. Adults are 2.7-3.2 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)

For more images of this species showing the array of variation, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Central and eastern United States, southeastern Canada, and northern Mexico; also introduced in Italy (3I)
Abundance: Recorded across the state, with a majority of records from the Piedmont where it is common; likely abundant across the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
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Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Recorded from mixed hardwood forest, forest edge, and grassy areas.
Plant Associates: Vitis riparia, Vitis sp., Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Ilex decidua, Cercis canadensis, Aesculus sp., Ulmus alata, among others (3I); has also been found on Black Gum
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: The nominate form of E. fulmina could be confused with E. vulnerata. E. vulnerata has a similar pattern to that of fulmina but is typically not as uniformly dark. It has pale lines on the head, rather than small pale spots, and there are slight differences in the wing pattern.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Erasmoneura vulnerata No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat. One red individual
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Harry Wilson
Wake Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to ultraviolet light.
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: unid_leafhopper
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: unid_leafhopper
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment:
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Durham Co.
Comment: ENRI
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights