Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Menosoma cinctum - No Common Name



© Mark Shields- note banded wing pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- typical pattern

© Paul Scharf- subspecies 'binaria'

© Kyle Kittelberger- blander individual
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: DeltocephalinaeTribe: Bahitini
Taxonomic Author: (Osborn and Ball, 1898)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A fairly distinctively marked species, ranging in color from greenish yellow to dark brown. Typically the wings have a pale base and brown apical half. This two-toned wing pattern/coloration is characteristic of M. cinctum. However, some individuals can be paler and less bold overall, with a less distinct, smaller pale transverse band across the wings. The wing venation is red to reddish-brown, with the cross nervures on each clavus and the costa black. The vertex is bluntly conical, being one-half longer in the middle than near the eyes. The scutellum is pale and concolorous with the wing bases. The underside of the body is dark. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin slightly rounded, slightly produced in the middle. The male subgenital plates are long with broad bases that concavely narrow to slender upturned apices. Adults are 5.5-6.0 mm long. (DeLong, 1948)

This species has three subspecies: binaria, cinctum, and mexicanum (found from Mexico to Argentina). Subspecies binaria resembles typical cinctum but has a much darker, more intensified coloration, appearing as almost black with a broad white band on the wings; it can be described [and is by some] as looking as if the hopper was dipped in paint. The wings have a bold black blotch on either side of the junction of the claval nervures, with two similarly-colored blotches at the base of the costa on each wing; the pale, whitish transverse wing band is between these dark markings and the blackish posterior halves of the wings. The rest of the wings are largely blackish except for a pair of pale spots at the apex of the clavi, and a hyaline area across the outer apical cells. The vertex and pronotum are pale with brown or fuscous markings. The vertex is slightly more angled than typical cinctum, and the female pregenital sternite is slightly shorter. This ssp. is 5.5 mm long. (Ball, 1931) Some more images of subspecies binaria: 1, 2, 3.

For diagrams of this species, see: 3i. For additional images showing variation, see: BG. Here is a neat image of a pair mating, showing difference in pattern and color.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and central North America, as far south as Argentina (3i)
Abundance: Scattered records across the state; surprisingly not encountered more, as it is typically locally common where it has been found.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Mixed hardwood forest and forest edge
Plant Associates: Quercus rubra, Salix sp. (DL)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: Some individuals of M. cinctum could potentially be confused with the rarely encountered M. stonei. For example, this individual looks a bit like stonei. However, note the wing venation is reddish-brown rather than the obvious red of stonei, the wings are not quite as tawny, and behind the brochosome patch on the costa of the wing you can make out some of the pale wing cell found on bland individuals of M. cinctum. The wing venation is also a little more complex, with extra veins or nervures, and the spot pattern is a little more dense.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Menosoma cinctum No Common Name

Photo by: Mark Shields
Onslow Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat and mixed hardwood forest edge
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Camden Co.
Comment: DISW
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat and mixed hardwood forest edge
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Wake Co.
Comment: grassy habitat and mixed hardwood forest edge
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Harry Wilson
Wake Co.
Comment: attracted to light - unid_leafhopper
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to black light.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: moth shhet
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.9 mm female
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.9 mm female
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 5.9 mm female
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV light. Greenway in wooded area.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV light. Greenway in wooded area.
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: lost image had bad file extension. - unid_leafhopper