Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
Scientific Name: Search Common Name:
Family (Alpha):
« »
MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Stictocephala militaris - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- top view

© Kyle Kittelberger- facial view
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: SmiliinaeSynonym: Ceresa militaris
Taxonomic Author: Van Duzee
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A greenish species with prominent red horns, a red pronotal ridge, and whitish speckling on the pronotum. The eyes can also be red, and the legs are green.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern North America, particularly the Southeast
Abundance: A common species, recorded mainly from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain. Seasonal distribution: 19 June-16 October (CTNC)
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in brushy, grassy habitat near mixed hardwood and pine forest.
Plant Associates: Cercis canadensis, Prunus serotina (CTNC)
Behavior: To listen to the male courtship call for this genus, listen here. These courtship calls are not audible to the human ear, and the calls here are produced by recording the substrate vibrations that the treehoppers use to communicate through the plants themselves. The recorded call is then amplified so that it is now audible to human ears. Research has shown that treehoppers use vibrations to attract mates, to announce the discovery of a good feeding site, or to alert a defending mother to the approach of a predator (T.IM).
Comment: Many Stictocephala may not be identifiable from an image; this is a very difficult group of treehoppers to identify correctly (for many species).
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Stictocephala militaris No Common Name

Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: UV light
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv light
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv light
Photo by: Hunter Phillips, Cathy Songer
Wayne Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Hunter Phillips, Cathy Songer
Wayne Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Tracy S. Feldman
Scotland Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: Tracy S. Feldman
Scotland Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: Tracy S. Feldman
Scotland Co.
Comment: unid_treehopper
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: moth lights on the sheet.
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: moth lights on the sheet.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Grassy open area.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf , Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahan
Halifax Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf , Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahan
Halifax Co.
Comment: Caught Sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B Bockhahn
Stanly Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Paul Scharf
Beaufort Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy habitat in a pine dominated forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Washington Co.
Comment: open forest habitat