Orthoptera of North Carolina
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Cyrtoxipha columbiana
Columbian Trig
checklist_number: 172.0
One of four species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), and the only one that has been recorded in North CarolinaA very small, pale yellow-green Trig. The color of the head, body, legs, and wings are pale lime green to yellow green; the eyes are often red or yellow (Caudell, 1907, said they were black). The ovip...This species inhabits small to large deciduous trees and shrubs, with habitats including peach orchards as well as mature hardwood forests. Elliott and Hershberger (2007) noted a preference -- at leas...Apparently undescribed but probably omnivorous...Mostly easily detected by its song, which is usually performed up in the trees out of reach. Elliott and Hershberger (2007) state that they can be collected by shaking the trees where they are present...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [S5?]Although we still have too few records for this species in North Carolina -- probably reflecting the difficulty in collecting specimens -- they do not appear to be specialized in terms of habitats or ...
Oecanthus exclamationis
Davis's Tree Cricket
checklist_number: 155.0
One of eighteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), eight of which have been recorded in North Carolina...............
Velarifictorus micado
Japanese Burrowing Cricket
checklist_number: 123.0
One of a large genus of Asian, African, and Australian species (Cigliano et al., 2017), with micado the single introduced species found in North AmericaA small, brown cricket with a distinctive pattern of pale stripes on its head. The head is brown with a unique white stripe that runs between the eyes and bases of the antennae. White stripes also run...Populations in natural habitats appear to be most common in riparian or mesic forests. However, it also occurs in lawns and other grassy areas in uplands. It may avoid dry to xeric habitats, however (...Presumably omnivorous...Males are easily detected by their songs. Individuals can be found under logs and other debris, although they dig their own burrows....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR SNA]As an introduced species, Velarifictorus does not merit any conservation efforts on its behalf, although its widespread penetration of natural areas should be monitored to see what effect it is having...
Orchelimum pulchellum
Handsome Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 212.0
............[GNR] [S4S5]...
Orchelimum minor
Lesser Pine Katydid
checklist_number: 210.0
............[GNR] [SU]...
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Orchelimum militare
Military Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 209.0
............[GNR] [SU]...
Orchelimum fidicinium
Seaside Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 208.0
............[GNR] [SU]...
Orchelimum erythrocephalum
Red-Headed Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 207.0
............[GNR] [S5]...
Orchelimum campestre
Dusky-Faced Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 204.0
............GNR [SU]...
Orchelimum agile
Agile Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 202.0
............[GNR] [S4S5]...
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Orchelimum vulgare
Common Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 214.0
............G5 [S4S5]...
Orchelimum concinnum
Stripe-Faced Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 206.0
............GNR [SU]...
Odontoxiphidium apterum
Wingless Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 201.0
............[GNR] [SU]...
Conocephalus spartinae
Saltmarsh Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 198.0
............[GNR] [SU]...
Conocephalus nigropleuroides
Tidewater Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 196.0
............[GNR] [SU]...
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Conocephalus aigialus
Seashore Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 191.0
One of nineteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), ten of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small green and yellow Lesser Meadow Katydid. Head, thorax, and the anterior portion of the abdomen are green, shading into bright yellow on the posterior portion of the abdomen, with the cerci also...According to Rehn and Hebard (1915), this species is restricted to beaches and tidal rivers along the Atlantic Coast, where it is found primarily in the halophytic vegetation growing along the shoreli.........[GNR] [SU]...
Conocephalus strictus
Straight-Lanced Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 200.0
One of nineteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), ten of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small (large for the genus), short-winged Lesser Meadow Katydid with highly distinctive reproductive structures. ............GNR [S5?]...
Conocephalus saltans
Prairie Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 197.0
One of nineteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), ten of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, reddish-brown to bluish-green, short-winged Lesser Meadow Katydid. The typical form is dull reddish-brown. The face is marked with a dark stripe or blotch and a wide stripe of brown runs from...Blatchley (1920) described this species as xerophilous, associated with dry upland prairies and sandy barrens..........G5 [SU]...
Conocephalus nemoralis
Woodland Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 195.0
............GNR [SU]...
Conocephalus fasciatus
Slender Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 194.0
One of nineteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), ten of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, slender, long-winged Lesser Meadow Katydid. The dorsal surface of the head, thorax, and abdomen are dark brown; on the abdomen, the dorsal band is bordered by pale lines which, in females, ar............G5 [S5]...
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Conocephalus brevipennis
Short-Winged Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 193.0
One of nineteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), ten of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, short-winged Lesser Meadow Katydid. The dorsal surface of the head, thorax, tegmina, and abdomen are usually dark brown to reddish brown. The face, sides of the head and thorax, and legs are ............G5 [S5]...
Pterophylla camellifolia
Common True Katydid
checklist_number: 246.0
.........Highly arboreal and rarely seen although they sometimes come to lights. Choruses, however, are so loud and distinctive they hard to miss. ...GNR [S5]...
Metaleptea brevicornis
Clipped-Wing Grasshopper
checklist_number: 1.0
One of two species in this genus and the only one that occurs in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2018)A medium-large, green and brown, Slant-faced Grasshopper. Males are usually green on their dorsal surfaces, from their face and top of the head, across the thorax, and onto the dorsal field of the teg...Morse (1904) described the habitat as consisting of the "rank herbage of swamps, meadows, and the vicinity of streams". The majority of our records come from these habitats, primarily grassy areas alo...Apparently undescribed but probably consists primarily of graminoids...Probably best found by flushing it by walking through its habitat. When disturbed, however, they may fly for some distance before landing....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsG5 [S5]This species may once been associated primarily with beaver pond habitats but was able to persist in other wet, grassy, shorelines when the beaver were nearly exterminated over most of the continent. ...
Conocephalus allardi
Allard's Meadow Katydid
checklist_number: 192.0
One of nineteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), ten of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, green and brown, short-winged Lesser Meadow Katydid. The face, sides of the thorax, and legs are green, as are the tegmina in the females; in males, the tegmina are brownish-green (Blatchley,...Allard (as described by Blatchley, 1920) found this species at an elevation above 4,000 in northern Georgia, where it occurred in sunny, grassy spots in the woods..........[GNR] [SH]We have only a single, historic record for this species, which appears to occupy a fairly narrow geographic range in the Southern Appalachians and adjoining areas to the west (see map in SINA). Survey...
Anaxipha tinnulenta
Slow-Tinkling Trig
checklist_number: 170.0
One of thirteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2017); eight have been recorded in North Carolina. Tinnulenta belongs to the Exigua Species Group, which also includes exigua, tinnula, thomasi, and tinnulacita in North Carolina (Walker and Funk, 2014).A very small, brown Trig. Like other members of the exigua group, it possess a broad dark stripe on the lateral face of the femur (Walker and Funk, 2014). Structural features -- particularly the numbe...Our recent records come from low-lying old field habitats or from the edge of the woods bordering these fields. These habitat agree with the description given by Walker and Funk (2014): "generally mor...Apparently unrecorded; possibly omnivorous...Singing males are most easily detected but they may also be captured using sweep netting...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [S4?]We currently have records for this species from just a small area of the state, with most of those records being historic. However, it appears to occupy common types of habitats and is likely to found...
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Anaxipha tinnula
Tidewater Trig
checklist_number: 168.0
One of thirteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2017); eight have been recorded in North Carolina. Tinnula belongs to the Exigua Species Group, which also includes exigua, tinnulacita, thomasi, and tinnulenta in North Carolina (Walker and Funk, 2014).A very small, brown Trig. Like other members of the exigua group, it possess a stripe on the lateral face of the femur, although it is often pale or obsolescent in this species (Walker and Funk, 2014)...Appears to be restricted to marsh grasses, including those of saltwater marshes (Carolina Beach) and fresh-to-brackish marshes (New Bern and Swanquarter) (Fulton, 1956)...Associated with tall grasses, sedges, and rushes but its exact diet is unrecorded...Most easily detected by its song. Fulton (1956) noted that tinnula, like tinnulenta and tinnulacita, sing most vigorously in the morning and much less on cool nights....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [S3S4]All of our records for this species are historic, although it is highly likely to still occur in our coastal marshes. It appears to be highly specialized on tall marsh graminoids and is likely to be v...
Anaxipha thomasi
Thomas's Trig
checklist_number: 167.0
One of thirteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2017); eight have been recorded in North Carolina. Thomasi belongs to the Exigua Species Group, which also includes exigua, tinnula, tinnulacita, and tinnulenta in North Carolina (Walker and Funk, 2014).A very small, brown Trig. Like other members of the Exigua group, it possess a broad dark stripe on the lateral face of the femur (Walker and Funk, 2014). Structural features -- particularly the numbe...This species appears to be particularly tied to pine forests (Walker and Funk, 2014) and our one record comes from an upland stand dominated by Shortleaf Pine with some Scrub Pine also present. ...Apparently unrecorded; possibly omnivorous...Singing males are most easily detected but they may also be captured using sweep netting...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [SU]This recently described species is still too poorly known across its range to estimate either its global or state conservation status. Its occurrence in stands of upland pine forests suggests, however...
Anaxipha exigua
Say's Trig
checklist_number: 165.0
One of thirteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2017); eight have been recorded in North Carolina. Exigua belongs to the Exigua Species Group, which also includes tinnula, thomasi, tinnulacita, and tinnulenta in North Carolina (Walker and Funk, 2014).A very small, brown Trig. Like other members of the exigua group, it possess a broad dark stripe on the lateral face of the femur (Walker and Funk, 2014). Structural features -- particularly the numbe...Fulton (1956) described the habitat of his trilling form of exigua (now recognized as true exigua) as consisting of deeply shaded mesic to wet forests, becoming most abundant in wet seeps dominated by...Apparently unrecorded; possibly omnivorous...Singing males are most easily detected but they may also be captured using sweep netting...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [S4S5]This species has been recorded over a fairly wide area of the state and occupies fairly common types of habitats. Consequently, it is probably secure in the state....
Anaxipha delicatula
Chirping Trig
checklist_number: 164.0
One of thirteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2017); eight have been recorded in North Carolina. Delicatula is part of the Delicatula Species Group, which also includes A. vernalis.A very small, brown Trig. Unlike most members of the Exigua Group, it lacks a stripe on the lateral face of the femur (Walker and Funk, 2014). Structural features -- particularly the number of pegs on...Occurs with tinnula in "in cordgrass marshes of coastal NC" (Walker and Funk, 2014); they also occur in "fresh water marshes, including lizardtail (Saururus) and cattails (Typha); on herbaceous underg...Apparently unrecorded; possibly omnivorous...Singing males are most easily detected but they may also be captured using sweep netting...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [SU]This species reaches the northern extent of its range in North Carolina and except possibly for the specimens from Corolla, our few records are all historic. While it seems likely that the species sti...
Phyllopalpus pulchellus
Handsome Trig
checklist_number: 163.0
One of six species in this primarily Neotropical genus and the only one that occurs in the eastern United State (Cigliano et al., 2017)A small but strikingly marked Trig. The head and thorax are crimson red; the palps, antennal bases, sides of the tegmina, abdomen, and ovipositor are shining black; and the antennae and legs are pale...Occurs in both herbaceous vegetation fairly close to the ground to low shrubs and trees. Lowland and mesic habitats seem to be preferred but they can also be found upslope. They inhabit residential ne......More often heard than seen but active both day and night and can be spotted in low vegetation...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.GNR [S5]Common and widespread across the state. Appears to be quite secure....
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Oecanthus quadripunctatus
Four-Spotted Tree Cricket
checklist_number: 161.0
One of eighteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), eight of which have been recorded in North Carolina...............
Oecanthus niveus
Narrow-Winged Tree Cricket
checklist_number: 159.0
One of eighteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), eight of which have been recorded in North Carolina...............
Oecanthus latipennis
Broad-Winged Tree Cricket
checklist_number: 157.0
One of eighteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), eight of which have been recorded in North Carolina...............
Oecanthus celerinictus
Fast-Calling Tree Cricket
checklist_number: 154.0
One of eighteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (SINA, 2018), eight of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, pale yellow-green tree cricket. Coloration and outward appearance are very similar to O. quadripunctatus, although the black markings on the basal segment of the antennae are distinctive: acc...Walker (1963) describes the habitat of this species as consisting of forbs and brambles growing in old fields and other open situations, often in drier habitats than other species in the nigricornis g...Omnivorous (Fulton, 1915)......[GNR][SU]...
Pictonemobius ambitiosus complex
checklist_number: 150.0
One of four species in this genus, all of which are confined to southeastern North America (Cigliano et al., 2017). While one member of this genus has been recorded in North Carolina, it is not clear which species it represents (Gross et al., 1989).A small, reddish-brown ground cricket. Members of this genus are distinguished by their facial markings: the face is shining black, with a narrow pale stripe between the eyes (Hebard, 1913). The verte...Most of the species in this genus are associated with dry, open, oak woodlands growing on sandhills. At least some populations of ambitiosus in South Carolina, occur in river bottomlands or stands of...Probably omnivorous...Males sing primarily during the day and are most easily detected by their songs...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GR SU]Members of this genus have been rarely collected even in South Carolina and the only records we have from North Carolina are the ones collected by Fulton in the 1930s. Although more needs to be learne...
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Neonemobius variegatus
Variegated Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 149.0
One of six species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017), three of which have been recorded in North CarolinaHebard (1913) describes the general color as clay yellow mottled or flecked with mummy brown. The head below the antennae is distinctively shining dark brown, but the occiput is cinnamon, mottled wit...Fulton (1931) describes the habitat as consisting of stream borders, particularly on somewhat open gravel bars. ...Probably omnivorous...Based on Fulton's (1931) comments, this species may be difficult to detect by ear....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [SU]We have very few records for this species and there is comparatively little information in the literature. The habitat of this species, however, is widespread and it has probably been generally overlo...
Neonemobius cubensis
Cuban Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 147.0
One of six species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017), three of which have been recorded in North CarolinaCubensis is a small, brownish-black ground cricket that is similar in general appearance and color to palustris but is not as solid in coloration, possessing patches of pale grayish-buff markings (Heb...Fulton (1931) states that cubensis is largely a marsh species, found at the edges of both freshwater and brackish marshes; also found along streams and other moist places with dense herbaceous cover...Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by its song...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR S4S5]This species appears to be widespread and occupies fairly common habitat types. It therefore seems to be secure within the state. ...
Eunemobius melodius
Melodious Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 146.0
One of three species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017), all of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, dark ground cricket. Slightly larger but indistinguishable from E. carolinus in coloration and general structure (Thomas and Howard, 1957). That includes pale colored palps in both sexes (see...The original populations in Ohio were associated with marshes (Thomas and Howard, 1957). These included sites with relict, boreal species of plants, as well as areas grazed by livestock....Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by its song. Thomas and Howard (1957) also report finding individuals by tearing apart a rotten, water-soaked log....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR SU]Only two populations have been recorded in North Carolina. This is probably mainly due to a lack of surveys but possibly also to confusion -- especially morphologically -- with Eunemobius carolinus. ...
Eunemobius carolinus
Carolina Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 144.0
One of three species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017), all three of which have been recorded in North CarolinaA small, yellowish-brown ground cricket. The pale palps serve to distinguish this species from all other of our ground crickets except for Eunemobius confusus and melodius. The palps of confusus are a...Fulton (1931) describes carolinus as occurring in a wide variety of habitats but usually where the soil moisture is fairly high. These include riparian, bottomland, and mesic hardwoods; marshes; and ...Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by song. Comes at least occasionally to lights, especially macropterous forms....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [S5]Eunemobius carolina is one of our most widespread and most often encountered species. It occupies a wide range of habitats, including suburban areas, and seems to be fairly secure within the state....
Allonemobius walkeri
Walker's Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 143.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.A red-brown to blackish ground cricket (following Alexnder and Thomas's description of allardi). The head is brown with two to three darker stripes, which are usually not contrasting, particularly at ...According to Howard and Furth (1986), A. walkeri inhabits dry grassy fields and pastures, nearly always co-occurring with A. allardi, at least where their geographic ranges overlap. Records from North...Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by its song...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR SU]Although this species appears to be associated with common types of habitats, it was considered rare by Howard and Furth (1986). Not enough is yet known about its distribution, abundance, and habitat ...
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Allonemobius tinnulus
Tinkling Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 142.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.Fulton described tinnulus as tawny, with the head and pronotum cinnamon brown; the stripes on the head are faint or absent. Other members of the fasciatus group are darker or more strongly striped on ...According to Fulton (1931), tinnulus is a woodland species, occurring in both pine woodlands and dry oak-hickory woodlands....Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by song...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [S4S5]This species appears to be widespread across the state and associated with common types of forest habitats. Consequently, it appears to be secure....
Allonemobius sparsalsus
Salt-Marsh Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 141.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.A small, blackish cricket associated with coastal Spartina marshes. Fulton (1930) described its color as a "nearly uniform dark sepia, becoming nearly black on the occiput, pronotum, dorsal field and...Apparently confined to Spartina marshes along the coast. According to Fulton (1930), individuals reside up in crowns of the plants, out of reach of the fiddler crabs that are abundant in the same habi...Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by song. Fulton noted that they can be captured by driving them towards a net but that sweeping the vegetation is not very productive....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR SU]We currently have very few records for this species, which appears to be a narrow habitat specialist. The habitat of this species, moreover, is likely to be highly affected by sea-level rise, with th...
Allonemobius maculatus
Spotted Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 139.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.A small, chestnut to dark brown ground cricket. The eyes of both sexes have a characteristic pale, yellowish ring around the outer side. The thorax and hind legs are spotted with piceous (glossy, blac...According to Fulton (1931), maculatus is strictly a forest species, ranging from bottomland hardwoods to stands of mesic hardwoods on slopes. Some degree of shade and the presence of hardwood leaf lit...Probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by song...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [S4S5]This species is at least somewhat specialized in its habitat associations and the lack of hindwings probably limits its ability to disperse. Although more records are needed to determine its distribut...
Allonemobius griseus funeralis
Dusky Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 138.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.A dark brown ground cricket with a suffusion of gray (Hebard, 1913). The face below the antennae is shining black, contrasting with the top of the head that has alternating dark and pale stripes simil...Fulton (1931) describes funeralis as associated with dry, grassy old field habitats dominated by Andropogon virginicus, reaching its greatest abundance where the grass clumps are sparse enough to allo...Probably omnivorous...Fulton (1931) describes this cricket as secretive -- rarely coming out from under vegetation -- and consequently seldom seen. Most easily detected by its song....Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[G5TNR S3S5]Fulton (1931) noted that this species seldom comes out from under grass clumps and is difficult to capture, a factor he thought might account for its rarity in collections. Its association with Broom ...
Allonemobius fultoni
Fulton's Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 136.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.A red-brown to blackish ground cricket (following Alexnder and Thomas' description of allardi). The head is brown with two to three darker stripes, which are usually not contrasting, particularly at t...Associated with wet grassy areas, including marshes, or in heavily shaded woods (Howard and Furth, 1986)...Probably omnivorous...Mostly easily detected by its song...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR SU]This species was considered rare by Howard and Furth (1986), who had collected it only at two sites in New Jersey and one in North Carolina; Walker (2017) shows only three additional sites, in Georgia...
sciNametaxonomic_commentsid_commentshabitatdietobservation_methodsstate_protectionNHP_ranksstatus_comments
Allonemobius allardi
Allard's Ground Cricket
checklist_number: 135.0
One of ten species in this genus, all of which occur in North America north of Mexico (Cigliano et al., 2017). Eight species have been recorded in North Carolina.A red-brown to blackish ground cricket (Alexander and Thomas, 1959). The head is brown with two to three darker stripes, which are usually not contrasting, particularly at the rear of the head, but fo...Allonemobius allardi inhabits well-drained grassy and weedy habitats, including "lawns, pastures, fields, and roadsides" (Alexander and Thomas, 1959). It often occurs with A. walkeri, but tinnulus is ...Probably omnivorous...Mostly easily detected by its song, which is given both day and night. ...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public landsGNR [SU]There are still too few records for this species in North Carolina to determine its distribution and conservation status. Records from the Piedmont need to be verified based on spectrograms or, prefer...
Cycloptilum trigonipalpum
Forest Scaly Cricket
checklist_number: 132.0
One of sixteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Love and Walker, 1979), six of which have been recorded in North Carolina. Trigonipalpum belongs to the Trigonipalpum Species Group (the Trilling Scaly Crickets), which includes two additional species, neither of which occurs in North Carolina.A slender-bodied, elongated Scaly Cricket. The cuticle of the head, pronotum, and legs are yellow to brown, and the abdomen is blackish (Love and Walker, 1979). The entire body is covered with pale, t...Love and Walker (1979) state that this species prefers broadleaf, deciduous trees, especially where there are frequent branches, vines, and dead leaves; pines are also used, at least where grapes and ...Undescribed but possibly omnivorous...Most easily detected by their songs but at least some species in this genus have been observed at bait...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [S5?]This species appears to have a broad range within the state and will probably be found over most of our area eventually. It does not appear to be specialized in terms of habitat and can make use of at...
Cycloptilum tardum
Slow Scaly Cricket
checklist_number: 131.0
One of sixteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Love and Walker, 1979), four of which have been recorded in North Carolina. Cycloptilum tardum belongs to the Bidens Complex of the Squamosum Species Group of Love and Walker (1979).A very small, mottled brown Scaly Cricket. The general color is light reddish brown but the scales are blackish or dark gray, producing a mottled appearance overall, especially in unworn individuals (...Love and Walker (1979) describe the habitat as poorly drained and frequently burned, including flatwoods dominated by Slash Pine or Longleaf Pine and with a dense shrubby understory. Our one confirme...Unrecorded but probably omnivorous...Members of this species group live either on the ground or in dense ground cover and are hard to observe directly. Singing males are the easiest to detect and to identify. Spectrograms or waveforms sh...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [SU]This species is possibly a specialist on wet Longleaf Pine habitats, but we have too few documented records for this species -- especially given the uncertainty of all records for this species outside...
Cycloptilum slossoni
Slosson's Scaly Cricket
checklist_number: 130.0
One of sixteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Love and Walker, 1979), four of which have been recorded in North Carolina. Slossoni belongs to the Slossoni Species Group (the Complex Chirping Scaly Crickets), which includes two additional species, neither of which occurs in North Carolina.A very small (but larger than trigonipalpum), reddish to brownish Scaly Cricket. The cuticle of the pronotum is yellowish-brown with a reddish cast; that of the abdomen is dark brown to blackish. The ...Love and Walker (1979) describe this species as occurring in shrubs and low trees in woodland and scrub habitats in natural communities in the Coastal Plain, but also including ornamental plants in re...Unrecorded but probably omnivorous...Most easily detected by their songs but we have at least one record from bait...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [SU]We have very few records for this species, most of them historic. More surveys need to be conducted to determine the taxonomic identity, distribution, abundance, and habitat affinities of this specie...
Cycloptilum bidens
Two-Toothed Scaly Cricket
checklist_number: 128.0
One of sixteen species in this genus that occur in North America north of Mexico (Love and Walker, 1979), four of which have been recorded in North Carolina. Cycloptilum bidens belongs to the Bidens Complex of the Squamosum Species Group of Love and Walker (1979).A very small, mottled brown Scaly Cricket. The general color is light reddish brown but the scales are blackish or dark gray, producing a mottled appearance overall, especially in unworn individuals (...Love and Walker (1979) describe the habitat of bidens in Florida as well-drained, frequently burned areas of sandy soil, usually supporting stands of Longleaf Pine and/or xerophytic oaks; in North Car...Undescribed but this species is possibly omnivorous...Members of this species group live either on the ground or in dense ground cover and are hard to observe directly. Singing males are the easiest to detect and to identify. Spectrograms or waveforms sh...Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands[GNR] [SU]This species is possibly a specialist on Longleaf Pine sandhills habitats, but we have too few documented records for this species -- especially given the uncertainty of all records for this species o...