The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

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Related Species in CORDULIIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

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e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Uhler's Sundragon by John Petranka
Move the cursor over the image to reveal Identification Tips.
Compare with: Selys's Sundragon
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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sciName Helocordulia uhleri
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Uhler's Sundragon
distribution Scattered over the mountains and Piedmont, with a gap (probably due to collecting effort) in the west-central portions of the Piedmont. Might well occur in all counties in the two provinces, as it ranges east to Halifax, Wake, Harnett, and Scotland counties. Probably occurs on very rare occasions in the Sandhills portion of the Coastal Plain.
abundance Declining in recent years, with shockingly no records in 2017 or 2018. Less numerous in NC than Selys's Sundragon in most counties where both occur (i.e., the eastern Piedmont). Very uncommon to unncommon in the eastern third of the Piedmont, but seemingly quite rare westward, with most records in the western part of the state lying close to the Blue Ridge escarpment. The gap of records in the west-central Piedmont is bizarre and suggests that the species must be very rare there, but as there are many records from the foothills and from the eastern Piedmont, it certainly ought to be present in all Piedmont counties.
flight Somewhat similar to Selys's Sundragon, though occurring later into early summer. In the Piedmont, from very late March or early April to late June, but scarce after early May. Dates in the mountains fall between mid-April and late June, and the single Coastal Plain record is for mid-April.
habitat Creeks and slower-flowing rivers, in shaded or semi-shaded forested areas. Apparently in slightly larger bodies of water than for Selys's, but habitat certainly overlaps.
behavior Males patrol territories over creeks and rivers, but fly longer and faster patrols than does Selys's. Adults are like most baskettails and Selys's Sundragon in foraging well away from water along trails and roads, perching for easy observation.
comments Though this species has a wider, more Northern, range than does Selys's, it is the less common of the two in NC, though active observers in the eastern Piedmont might see one or two Uhler's each spring. The two sundragons are quite similar in appearance, with Uhler's having a small amber spot (lacking in Selys's) at the base of each wing; these spots can be difficult to see in the field, but good, close photographs show the mark well.
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S_rank S3S4
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G_rank G5
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Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Uhler's Sundragon

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Orange, 2016-04-07, New Hope Creek in Duke Forest just upstream from Old Erwin Road. Male. Photo.
Photo by: Owen McConnell

Comment: Graham, 2015-04-27, old logging road near FS 81 bridge over Big Santeetlah Creek
Photo by: Owen McConnell

Comment: Graham, 2015-04-27, old logging road near FS 81 bridge over Big Santeetlah Creek
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Haywood, 2013-04-20, Cold Creek near I40 - Male & Female
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Gail Lankford, Janie Owen

Comment: Haywood, 2012-04-28, Found along Cold Creek, Pisgah Forest - Male & Female
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Gail Lankford, Janie Owen

Comment: Haywood, 2012-04-28, Found along Cold Creek, Pisgah Forest - Male & Female
Photo by: Dorothy E. Pugh

Comment: Orange, 2011-04-06. Seen at Johnston Mill Nature Preserve
Photo by: Ricky Davis

Comment: Halifax, 2010-04-11, - Medoc Mountain State Park
Photo by: Ricky Davis

Comment: Halifax, 2010-04-11, Medoc Mountain State Park