The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

North Carolina's 187 Odonate species
Sort by: Family (Taxonomic) Scientific Name
 
Related Species in AESHNIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
[View PDF]
Fawn Darner by Mark Shields
Identification Tips: reveal Identification Tips by moving cursor over the image.
Compare with: Ocellated Darner  
Note: The characters apply to both sexes.

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sciName Boyeria vinosa
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Fawn Darner
distribution Nearly statewide, but apparently absent from the immediate eastern Coastal Plain north and south of Albemarle Sound. No records east of Gates, Chowan, Beaufort, and Carteret counties.
abundance Uncommon to fairly common (but easily overlooked) in the mountains, Piedmont, and upper Coastal Plain; less numerous in much of the Coastal Plain, but not rare except near the coast.
flight The flight begins in mid-June in the Piedmont and mountains, but in late May or early June in the Coastal Plain. It extends into early November in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, and to late October in the mountains.
habitat Flies low over creeks, typically following the creek banks, poking into nooks and crannies. Favors somewhat slow-moving creeks in hardwood forests.
behavior This species and the Ocellated Darner like dark places. It rests for most of the day inside a forest, hanging on twigs; sometimes disturbed when an observer is walking through a forest near a creek. It normally flies late in the afternoon and at dusk.
comments This species must often be intentionally searched for, looking around creeks late in the day. A dragonfly flying slowly back and forth along creek banks, in shady situations, is often a Fawn Darner.
state_status
S_rank S5
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Fawn Darner

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Stokes, 2018-10-07, Dan River @ NC 704 - netted, photographed and released
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Surry, 2018-10-06, Mitchell River @ public fishing area along SR 1330
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Forsyth, 2018-09-07, Yadkin River @ SR 1605 (Old US 421)
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Hoke, 2018-09-03, Lumber River, from Wagram Boating Access Area to LURI-Chalk Banks boat ramp and back, by kayak
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Yadkin, 2018-08-26, Pilot Mountain S.P.; river section
Photo by: Ken Kneidel

Comment: Yancey, 0000-00-00,
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Alleghany, 2018-07-15, New River @ SR 1345 (Farmers Fish Camp Rd.)
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt.

Comment: Columbus, 2017-11-02, Lumber River at Fair Bluff. Along the River Walk boardwalk. - Males. One feeding on a male Smoky Rubyspot.
Photo by: Rob Van Epps

Comment: Scotland, 2017-10-01, NC Sandhills Gamelands
Photo by: Rob Van Epps

Comment: Scotland, 2017-10-01, NC Sandhills Gamelands
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt.

Comment: Wilkes; M, 2017-09-27, Stone Mountain State Park, East Prong of the Roaring River. Along river near parking area at end of the paved part of Stone Mnt. Rd.. - 6 males and 1 female, including 1 mating pair. 2 males netted, photographed and released.
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Duplin, 2017-09-24, Northeast Cape Fear River, from Chinquapin Boating Access Area to 3 km upstream and 1 km downstream, by kayak
Photo by: Jim Petranka

Comment: Madison, 2017-09-21, In Ivy River along Forks-of-Ivy Road. - Several individuals were observed working the stream edge during mid-afternoon.
Photo by: Conrad Wernett

Comment: Harnett; P, 2017-07-29, - RAR
Photo by: Conrad Wernett, Alyssa Wernett

Comment: Onslow, 2017-05-18, - Female along Cowhorn Creek
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2016-07-04, at my house late in the evening - netted right at dusk patrolling my yard
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Jones, 2016-06-04, White Oak River between Quarry lakes and Dixon Field Landing
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Jones, 2016-06-04, White Oak River between Quarry lakes and Dixon Field Landing
Photo by: Owen McConnell

Comment: Graham, 2015-08-19, at cabin porch after dusk, along West Buffalo Creek
Photo by: Conrad Wernett, Alyssa Wernett

Comment: Jones, 2015-06-28, - Found at landing along the White Oak River
Photo by: Conrad Wernett, Alyssa Wernett

Comment: Richmond; C, 2015-06-14, - Found patrolling Lake McKinney drainage.
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2014-09-04, at Meat Camp ESA
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2012-08-30, at Meat Camp ESA
Photo by: Conrad Wernett, Ali Iyoob

Comment: Wake, 2012-07-29, - One recently emerged specimen and sighting of one high in tree
Photo by: Doug Johnston, Vin Stanton

Comment: Madison, 2012-07-22, Sandy Mush Gamelands
Photo by: Mike Turner

Comment: Wake, 2012-07-15, Tailrace below the Falls Lake dam
Photo by: Doug Johnston

Comment: Buncombe, 2010-08-20, - Turkey creek, North buncombe county
Photo by: E. Corey

Comment: Ashe, 2009-08-27, NERI
Photo by: ASH

Comment: Moore; C, 2003-09-06, WEWO - In wheel position on Pine Island Trail.