The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
Home Page Search
LoginNC Biodiversity Project

North Carolina's 187 Odonate species

Sort Species by: Family   Scientific Name       [ Undocumented ]
Related Species in GOMPHIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
[View PDF]
Edmund's Snaketail (Ophiogomphus edmundo) by John Petranka
Compare with: Appalachian Snaketail   Maine Snaketail   Rusty Snaketail   Brook Snaketail  
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

[Google images]
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Edmund's Snaketail
distribution According to the OdonataCentral map, this species has now been found in just 10 counties in its range, in western NC, southeastern TN, extreme western SC, and northern GA. The NC range is the escarpment/foothills, in Caldwell and Burke counties, plus a few sites in Stokes and Rockingham counties in the northwestern Piedmont. This clubtail species ought to be present in other NC foothill counties, especially south of Burke County, as well as in the gap between Stokes and Caldwell counties.
abundance Very rare throughout its range, as well as in NC. However, at the very few locations where found, there have been moderate numbers seen in a given day, as opposed to just a single individual.
flight The flight in NC, based on 19 records, is from mid-April to early June, if not slightly longer. The Georgia records fall between 24 April and 25 May (Giff Beaton's website).
habitat Rivers and larger creeks with fast-flowing, clear water. The three bodies of water (Mayo and Dan rivers and Wilson Creek) where recently seen in NC are fast-flowing large creeks/small rivers.
behavior Males are seldom seen except when perching on rocks in the rivers and streams. Dunkle (2000) says that the adults, at least males, spend most of their time high in trees.
comments This species was considered to be of historical global occurrence (GH) until re-discovered in 1994 in the NC foothills. It has been searched for in the state in the Burke/Caldwell vicinity a few times since the discovery, but observers had met with failure until John Petranka found some numbers at two sites along Wilson Creek in Caldwell County, in May 2016. Of greater significance was Ed Corey's remarkable discovery of the species in Rockingham County in 2012, observing 16 individuals, photographing and collecting one to document this major range extension into the middle Piedmont. Other biologists have re-found this species there in recent years. In spring 2017, Brian Bockhahn and Kyle Kittelberger discovered a new location at the Dan River in Stokes County. With a global rank of G1G2, this may be globally the rarest dragonfly that occurs in NC. In fact, it ought to have been Federally listed as Endangered or Threatened already.
state_status SR
S_rank S1
fed_status
G_rank G1G2
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Edmund's Snaketail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: Mark Shields and Hunter Phillips

Comment: Rockingham, 2018-05-13, Mayo River State Park (MARI) upstream from Anglin Mill Rd bridge and downstream from bridge - males perched on rocks in river
Photo by: Mike Boatwright

Comment: Rockingham, 2018-05-08, Observed above Anglin Mill Bridge and below the rapids near beach at intersection of Old Anglin Mill Loop and Mayo Beach Road - 3 males observed above the Anglin Mill Bridge, 4 observed below the rapids near beach at intersection of Old Anglin Mill Loop and Mayo Beach Road; first observed around 1015 hrs and seen off and on until at least 1600 hrs.
Photo by: Mike Boatwright

Comment: Rockingham, 2018-05-08, Observed above Anglin Mill Bridge and below the rapids near beach at intersection of Old Anglin Mill Loop and Mayo Beach Road - 3 males observed above the Anglin Mill Bridge, 4 observed below the rapids near beach at intersection of Old Anglin Mill Loop and Mayo Beach Road; first observed around 1015 hrs and seen off and on until at least 1600 hrs.
Photo by: Mike Boatwright

Comment: Rockingham, 2018-05-08, Observed above Anglin Mill Bridge and below the rapids near beach at intersection of Old Anglin Mill Loop and Mayo Beach Road - 3 males observed above the Anglin Mill Bridge, 4 observed below the rapids near beach at intersection of Old Anglin Mill Loop and Mayo Beach Road; first observed around 1015 hrs and seen off and on until at least 1600 hrs.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn

Comment: Stokes, 2017-05-03, Hanging Rock State Park - Moratock Park.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn

Comment: Stokes, 2017-05-03, Hanging Rock State Park - Moratock Park.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn

Comment: Stokes, 2017-05-03, Hanging Rock State Park - Moratock Park.
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn

Comment: Stokes, 2017-05-03, Hanging Rock State Park - Moratock Park.
Photo by: Brian Bockhahn

Comment: Rockingham, 2017-05-02, Mayo River State Park - 6 males, 1 female; 3 were above Anglin Mill Road bridge
Photo by: Brian Bockhahn

Comment: Rockingham, 2017-05-02, Mayo River State Park - 6 males, 1 female; 3 were above Anglin Mill Road bridge
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Caldwell, 2016-05-09, Wilson Creek at Brown Mountain Beach Resort. 5 males, 1 female. Photo.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Caldwell, 2016-05-09, Wilson Creek at Brown Mountain Beach Resort. 5 males, 1 female. Photo.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Rockingham, 2016-04-13, Old Anglin Loop Road alongside Mayo River; just south of MARI. 2 males, 2 females. All yellowish immatures; no green on head or thorax. Photo.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Rockingham, 2016-04-13, Old Anglin Loop Road alongside Mayo River; just south of MARI. 2 males, 2 females. All yellowish immatures; no green on head or thorax. Photo.
Photo by: E. Corey

Comment: Rockingham, 2012-05-02, This species has a complete T3 stripe, whereas O. incurvatus only has a T3 stripe below the spiracle.
Photo by: E. Corey, B. Bockhahn

Comment: Rockingham, 2012-05-02, - mostly males, some patrolling riffles and runs