The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

North Carolina's 187 Odonate species
Sort by: Family (Taxonomic) Scientific Name
 
Related Species in GOMPHIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

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e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Banner Clubtail by Mark Shields
Identification Tips: reveal Identification Tips by moving cursor over the image.
Compare with: Spine-crowned Clubtail   Piedmont Clubtail  
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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sciName Hylogomphus apomyius
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Banner Clubtail
distribution Primarily found in the southwestern quarter of the Coastal Plain, ranging northeastward to the west-central Coastal Plain, and also into the southeastern Piedmont -- west to Catawba and Gaston counties. It is absent from coastal counties. NC lies at the northeastern end of the range, and thus Wilson, Wake, Chatham, and Catawba form the northern border of the range.
abundance Uncommon, at least in former years; might now be better stated "rare to uncommon and somewhat poorly known". Perhaps the species has declined in recent decades. Dunkle (2000) calls the species "scarce", and Beaton (2007) calls it "rare and local" in its range in Georgia.
flight Ranges from very early April to early June in the Coastal Plain. In the Piedmont, the flight appears to be slightly narrower -- mid-April to late May.
habitat Generally in clean streams and rivers with sandy or gravelly bottoms.
behavior Males perch on rocks or other perches close to rivers and streams. They are most active early in the morning and toward dusk.
comments This is one of the smaller clubtails (only up to 1.5 inches in length). Males have a very wide club. Despite its range occurring close to the locations of many biologists, it is poorly known to most persons, and thus the NC Natural Heritage Program has the species on its Watch List. The species can be easily confused with the Spine-crowned Clubtail; in fact, several former reports and photos listed as Banner Clubtail have been re-evaluated and determined to be Spine-crowned Clubtail. It is likely that this species has declined in the state since the time of Cuyler's collecting efforts; there are relatively few reports since the 1980s, at least in the northern half of the range in the state. Thankfully, Mark Shields and John Petranka have photographically documented new records of the species in spring 2017, along the South River in Sampson and Bladen counties. New county records for Hoke and Scotland were added in 2018, mostly by Mark Shields and Hunter Phillips, though nearly all records for these two counties have come from the same general area along the Lumber River (which forms the boundary between the counties).
state_status W
S_rank S3?
fed_status
G_rank G3G4
synonym Gomphus apomyius
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Banner Clubtail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: Richard Stickney

Comment: Scotland, 2018-04-22, Lumber River SP, Chalk Banks - Teneral, 1 each sex
Photo by: Mark Shields and Hunter Phillips

Comment: Hoke, 2018-04-05, Wagram Boating Access Area, Lumber River - teneral
Photo by: Mark Shields and Hunter Phillips

Comment: Scotland, 2018-04-05, Lumber River State Park (LURI) Chalk Banks - recently emerged tenerals
Photo by: Mark Shields and Hunter Phillips

Comment: Scotland, 2018-04-05, Lumber River State Park (LURI) Chalk Banks - recently emerged tenerals
Photo by: Mark Shields, John Petranka

Comment: Bladen, 2017-04-17, South River at Sloan's Bridge
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Bladen, 2017-04-16, South River at Sloan's Bridge
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Sampson, 2017-04-16, South River at Sloan's Bridge