The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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North Carolina's 187 Odonate species
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Related Species in GOMPHIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

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Mustached Clubtail (Hylogomphus adelphus) by John Petranka
Compare with: Green-faced Clubtail   Sable Clubtail   Cherokee Clubtail  
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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mapClick on county for list of all its records for Mustached Clubtail
distribution Mountains and adjacent foothills only; known from just eight counties, in the northern and central portions of the province. As expected from the state range map, this is a Northern species, ranging from Canada to northern GA (one record).
abundance Seemingly rare in the northern half of the mountains (and adjacent foothills), with seldom more than one or two individuals seen in a day. Obviously very rare, at best, in the southern half of the mountains. As there is a record for northern GA, it should occur sparingly in GA and SC border counties in NC.
flight A late spring to early summer flight; late May to late June. Records previously reported earlier in May have been determined by website reviewers to be of Green-faced or Cobra clubtails.
habitat Rivers to small streams, where there are riffles or rapids. Occasionally at lakes.
behavior The species is most active in late afternoon. Adults may perch on rocks, shorelines, and leaves near rivers and creeks.
comments This is one of many montane species of dragonflies that is poorly known to most state biologists; the species is likely found mainly with a purposeful search, late in the day. A photographic record made by Curtis Smalling in 2015 added Watauga County to the list of known counties. More importantly, photos from foothill sites in Caldwell (by Mark Shields) and McDowell (by Smalling) counties added two additional counties to the state range, especially indicating that it ranges downward into the transition zone with the Piedmont province. In 2018, John Petranka added photographic documentation for Avery County, though there is a vague previous sighting for that county.
state_status SR
S_rank S1S2
fed_status
G_rank G4
synonym Gomphus adelphus
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Mustached Clubtail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Avery, 2018-06-07, Linville River at Linville Falls Picnic Area third loop, Blue Ridge Parkway mile marker 316.5 - Male. Feeding from patch of sunny vegetation alongside river.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Avery, 2018-06-06, Linville River at Linville Falls Picnic Area middle loop, Blue Ridge Parkway mile marker 316.5 - Male. Perched on rocks near shore.
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: McDowell; M, 2017-06-06, at North Fork Catawba River 35.839236 -81.98814
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: McDowell; M, 2017-06-06, at North Fork Catawba River 35.839236 -81.98814
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Caldwell, 2017-06-04, Wilson Creek, US Forest Service access off Brown Mountain Beach Road
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2015-05-28, at Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area - 36.263300; -81.6300427
Photo by: Curtis Smalling

Comment: Watauga, 2015-05-28, at Meat Camp Creek Environmental Studies Area - 36.263300; -81.6300427