The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
Home Page Search
LoginNC Biodiversity Project

North Carolina's 187 Odonate species

Sort Species by: Family   Scientific Name       [ Undocumented ]
Related Species in GOMPHIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
[View PDF]
Midland Clubtail (Gomphurus fraternus) by John Petranka
Compare with: Splendid Clubtail   Cobra Clubtail   Cocoa Clubtail   Blackwater Clubtail   Septima's Clubtail  
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

[Google images]
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Midland Clubtail
distribution Known only from one site -- the Rocky River -- in the lower Piedmont. The distribution in the state would suggest that this is a Southern species, but in fact it is a Northeastern species, ranging south mainly to MD, WV, and western TN.
abundance Undoubtedly very rare in NC, as it is known from just a single body of water.
flight All of the records fall between 20 April and 8 May. It is assumed that adults are present for only a few weeks (at this site) -- probably mid-April to mid-May.
habitat Breeds at fast flowing rivers and large streams.
behavior Perch on rocks or banks near rivers. References indicate that this is a very fast and strong flier, able to overtake and feed on other dragonflies.
comments This is still another poorly known clubtail in NC. Its known state range -- two counties (Anson and Stanly) that border the Rocky River in the lower Piedmont -- is most unusual, as this is a Northeastern species. Does it not occur along the Flat, Eno, Haw, Cape Fear, and other rivers in the eastern Piedmont, where there has been more odonate field work? On the other hand, this is a difficult-to-identify species, unless a specimen is taken. In fact, photos of a clubtail from the Eno River in Orange County have been re-examined, and it was felt not to be a Midland Clubtail. (They were carried on this website as a "Midland" for several years.) Thankfully, John Petranka decided to travel to the Rocky River in spring 2017 to look for this species and, sure enough, re-found it along the river, but about 5.5 miles miles upriver from Duncan Cuyler's previous site. He saw and photographed several males on 20 April, which also extended the earliest state date by eight days.
state_status SR
S_rank S1
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym Gomphus fraternus
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Midland Clubtail

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Rocky River at the Plank Road canoe/kayak launch. About 5.5 river miles upstream from Cuyler's Hwy 52 site. - Males. Flying low over water occasionally landing on vegetation or boat launch at river's edge. Some individuals have a small dorsal spot on S9.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Rocky River at the Plank Road canoe/kayak launch. About 5.5 river miles upstream from Cuyler's Hwy 52 site. - Males. Flying low over water occasionally landing on vegetation or boat launch at river's edge. Some individuals have a small dorsal spot on S9.
Photo by: John Petranka

Comment: Rocky River at the Plank Road canoe/kayak launch. About 5.5 river miles upstream from Cuyler's Hwy 52 site. - Males. Flying low over water occasionally landing on vegetation or boat launch at river's edge. Some individuals have a small dorsal spot on S9.