The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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North Carolina's 187 Odonate species
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Related Species in LESTIDAE: Number of records for 2019 = 0

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e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
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Great Spreadwing (Archilestes grandis) by John Petranka, Sally Gewalt
Compare with:   Distinctive
Identification Tips: Move the cursor over the image, or tap the image if using a mobile device, to reveal ID Tips.
Note: no comparisons needed; obviously larger than all other species of spreadwing

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mapClick on county for list of all its records for Great Spreadwing
distribution Apparently throughout the mountains and Piedmont; and seemingly absent from the Coastal Plain. The range appears to stop at the Fall Line.
abundance Rare to uncommon in the mountains and the Piedmont foothills; rare in the remainder of the Piedmont, and very rare along the eastern edge of the range (Fall Line vicinity).
flight In the mountains, generally from early August to late September, and in the Piedmont mainly from late June to late November. A report from mid-May is perhaps in error.
habitat Along slow streams, but sometimes in rather degraded places.
behavior It can often be seen well away from streams, such as around ponds or in fields/forest edges.
comments This is a very large damselfly, larger than other spreadwings. The range seems a bit spotty in the mountains and western Piedmont, though the species is assumed to occur throughout these regions, and there are a number of recent records. Only in the past few years have records been made for the central and eastern Piedmont counties; however, the well-worked Triangle area (Orange, Durham, and Wake counties) has not had records in several decades.
state_status
S_rank S3S4
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Great Spreadwing

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt.

Comment: Alleghany, 2017-09-27, Stone Mountain State Park (STMO). Pond at Superintendent’s residence. - Males.
Photo by: John Petranka, Sally Gewalt

Comment: Watauga, 2017-09-22, Elk Knob State Park, small marshy pond. Elevation ca. 4,400ft. - 1 Male and 1 mating pair.
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2017-08-19, Richmond Hill Park - Male, near small creek in park
Photo by: Vin Stanton

Comment: Buncombe, 2017-08-19, Richmond Hill Park - Male, near small creek in park
Photo by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin

Comment: Madison, 2016-10-14, Several mating pairs observed in permanent, fish-free pond on River Bend Drive near Mars Hill.
Photo by: Jim Petranka

Comment: Avery, 2016-09-27, In a small, permanent, fish-free pond in southern Avery County.
Photo by: Dennis Burnette

Comment: Guilford, 2016-09-16, campus of UNC-Greensboro in Peabody Park - at least two individuals
Photo by: Dennis Burnette

Comment: Guilford, 2016-09-16, campus of UNC-Greensboro in Peabody Park - at least two individuals
Photo by: CL Goforth

Comment: Randolph, 2014-10-27,
Photo by: Nancy Cowal

Comment: McDowell; M, 2012-08-29, Old Fort / submitted by Vin Stanton - Female
Photo by: Steve Hall

Comment: Montgomery, 2011-06-23, Observed at margin of Roberdo Bog, Uwharrie National Forest
Photo by: Doug Johnston

Comment: Buncombe, 2010-08-30, By small pond, North Buncombe co.