The Dragonflies and Damselflies of North Carolina
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Once on a species account page, clicking on the "View PDF" link will show the flight data for that species, for each of the three regions of the state.
Other information, such as high counts and earliest/latest dates, can also been seen on the PDF page.

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Related Species in CALOPTERYGIDAE: Number of records for 2018 = 24

PDF has more details,
e.g., flight data, high counts, and earliest/latest dates can be seen.
[View PDF]
Sparkling Jewelwing by Mark Shields
Move the cursor over the image to reveal Identification Tips.
Compare with: Calopteryx amata Calopteryx angustipennis Calopteryx maculata
Note: these identification tips apply specifically to mature males; features may differ in immature males and in females.

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sciName Calopteryx dimidiata
mapClick on county for list of all its records for Sparkling Jewelwing
distribution Nearly statewide, but seemingly absent from the northeastern third of the Coastal Plain -- the "Pamlimarle Peninsula"and the counties north of Albemarle Sound. Of spotty occurrence in the mountains, but likely present in all counties there except perhaps ones lacking low elevations (e.g., Yancey, Mitchell, Avery, Watauga).
abundance Uncommon to locally fairly common throughout the Piedmont and most of the Coastal Plain, except for the northeastern third of the latter province, where rare to absent. Uncommon in the central Coastal Plain, but can be quite common in the southern portion of this province (with several daily counts of 350 or more individuals). Very rare in the mountains.
flight Early April to early October in the Coastal Plain, but so far just from mid-May to mid-September in the Piedmont. Though there are at least nine counties with records for the mountains, we have flight data only from early June to mid-August.
habitat Small streams, generally where fast-flowing and acidic, and not necessarily in forested areas.
behavior
comments Range maps in Paulson (2011) and Beaton (2007) show all of NC within the range of the species. This may be generous and "broad-brush", as it appears to be truly absent in northeastern NC and maybe absent in some of the northern mountain counties. The species is surprisingly rare in the mountains, considering its relative numbers in the Piedmont. Also, despite the heavy amount of odonate field work in the northeastern Piedmont, where many biologists live, there are no recent records there!
state_status
S_rank S5
fed_status
G_rank G5
synonym
other_name
Species account update: LeGrand

Photo Gallery for Sparkling Jewelwing

Other NC Galleries:    Jeff Pippen    Will Cook    Ted Wilcox
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Hoke, 2018-09-03, Lumber River, from Wagram Boating Access Area to LURI-Chalk Banks boat ramp and back, by kayak
Photo by: Mark Shields, Hunter Phillips, Cathy Songer

Comment: Brunswick, 2018-09-01, Rice\'s and Town creeks, from Rice\'s Creek Boating Access Area to US 17 bridge, by kayak
Photo by: Mike Turner, Conrad Wernett, Alyssa Wernett

Comment: Scotland, 2017-05-07, Sandhill Game Lands; creek at SR1328 (Hoffman Rd)
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Jones, 2017-04-11, Island Creek trail, Croatan National Forest
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Robeson, 2016-09-25, Lumber River, between Boardman Boating Access and Piney Island Campsite
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Columbus, 2016-08-27, Lumber River, between Boardman Boating Access and Lumber River State Park Princess Ann Access
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Pender, 2016-05-27, Black River between Henry's Landing and Hunt's Bluff Boating Access
Photo by: Mark Shields

Comment: Bladen, 2016-05-27, Black River between Henry's Landing and Hunt's Bluff Boating Access
Photo by: Conrad Wernett

Comment: Jones, 2015-07-26, - Four counted, several others seen along Island Creek. Odd note, not a single male found.
Photo by: Conrad Wernett, Alyssa Wernett

Comment: Richmond; C, 2015-06-14, - Males and female in foliage along Lake McKinney Drainage
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger

Comment: Moore; C, 2013-06-12, Weymouth Woods State Park - seen along James Creek and at beaver ponds
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Bud Webster

Comment: Transylvania, 2012-08-15, Brevard area - Male & Female
Photo by: Vin Stanton, Doug Johnston, Bud Webster

Comment: Transylvania, 2012-08-15, Brevard area - Male & Female
Photo by: Ali Iyoob, Matt Daw, Dan Irizarry

Comment: Richmond; C, 2011-05-05, McKinney Lake Fish Hatchery
Photo by: Lee Cramer

Comment: Mecklenburg, 2010-07-06, Umbrella Trail, Reedy Creek Nature Center and Preserve - female
Photo by: Beth Brinson

Comment: Guilford, 2009-06-19, HARI - male
Photo by: E. Corey

Comment: Cumberland, 2006-06-30, CACR - In creek near Atlantic White-cedar