Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGeometridae Members: 496 NC Records

Eutrapela clemataria (J.E. Smith, 1797) - Curve-toothed Geometer Moth



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Taxonomy
Superfamily: Geometroidea Family: GeometridaeSubfamily: EnnominaeTribe: OurapteryginiP3 Number: 911414.00 MONA Number: 6966.00
Comments: A genus with just one species, which occurs abundantly throughout eastern North America, including all of North Carolina
Species Status: There is very little variation in nucleotide sequence from North Carolina or elsewhere; no cryptic species are suspected.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, iNaturalistTechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1948; as Abbotana clemetaria)Technical Description, Immature Stages: Forbes (1948); Wagner et al. (2001); Wagner (2005)                                                                                 
Adult Markings: One of our largest Geometrid moths. It is variable in pattern but usually dark brown with a conspicuous pale line that runs straight from the inner margin to just below the apex where in makes a sharp inward turn towards the costa. The apex of the wing is falcate and often has a pale patch. The inter-antennal riddge is a contrasting bright white. This species is is unlikely to be confused with anything other than Prochroedes, which is similar in size and pattern and sometimes in color, but has smooth wing margins as opposed to the crenulate margins of Eutrapela. Sexes similar but the female is much larger and far less common at light.
Wingspan: 45-60 mm (Forbes, 1948)
Adult Structural Features: Male antennae are serrate. Reproductive structures of both the male and female are quite distinct from other large Geometrids.
Structural photos
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: Larvae are twig mimics and easily recognized with practice; the older larvae are quite distinct with their knobby head region and warts over A4 and A8.
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Occurs across the state, from the Barrier Islands to the High Mountains.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Shows up in late winter and is one of the most common species collected in the spring. This species appears to have two well drawn out broods which extend through most of the warm season.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: We have records from nearly all habitat types in the state -- wherever woody plants occur. Habitats span the entire spectrums of elevation, moisture, and soil pH. Both open and forested habitats are used, and human-altered as well as natural.
Larval Host Plants: In the late spring the caterpillars are apt to be found on almost any tree or shrub. We have reared individuals collected in Craven County (Ilex opaca, Myrica cerifera) and Jones County and New Hanover County (Vaccinium arboreum). See Wagner et al. (2001) for a lengthy list of host plant species.
Observation Methods: Adults come abundantly to light but we have no records from bait or flowers. Caterpillars are expected whenever one beats shrubs and trees.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for General Forests and Shrublands
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G5 [S5]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: One of the most widespread species in the state, as well as one of the most generalized in terms of host plants and habitat associations. Consequently, this species appears to be one of the most secure in North Carolina.

 Photo Gallery for Eutrapela clemataria - Curve-toothed Geometer Moth

90 photos are available. Only the most recent 30 are shown.

Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-05-03
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-04-06
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-03-28
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-03-28
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2020-03-27
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-03-26
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-03-26
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2020-03-17
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-03-11
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-02-12
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-02-03
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: L. M. Carlson on 2019-08-12
Orange Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-08-07
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-07-22
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2019-07-13
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-07-04
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-06-22
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-06-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-06-02
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-05-28
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-04-11
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2019-04-07
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2019-04-07
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-04-06
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-03-30
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-03-25
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Gary Maness on 2019-03-15
Guilford Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2019-02-16
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2018-09-20
Durham Co.
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Recorded by: Simpson Eason on 2018-08-10
Durham Co.
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