Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFGracillariidae Members: 13 NC Records

Caloptilia stigmatella (Fabricius, 1781) - No Common Name


Taxonomy
Superfamily: Gracillarioidea Family: GracillariidaeSubfamily: GracillariinaeTribe: [Gracillariini]P3 Number: 330161.00 MONA Number: 639.00
Comments: Caloptilia is a large genus with nearly 300 described species; 64 species have been described in North America north of Mexico. The larvae begin as leaf-mining sap-feeders, but the latter instars usually exit the mines and feed within a conical roll that begins at the leaf apex or at the tip of a leaf lobe.
Species Status: Caloptilia stigmatella is widely distributed in the Holarctic Region, including most of Europe, and eastern and western North America. DNA analyses (BOLD) indicate that there are several major evolutionary lineages that may eventually be recognized as separate species. Populations in North America are genetically distinct from those in Europe.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuide, BAMONATechnical Description, Adults: Chambers, 1872. Technical Description, Immature Stages: Eiseman, 2019.                                                                                  
Adult Markings: The antennae, palps, upper head, thorax, and forewings have a rich, dark brown ground color. Each forewing has a light yellow to yellowish white, triangular costal patch that is usually hooked backwards near the tip. A series of fine dark brown spots are normally present along the costa. The femur and tibia of the front and middle leg are dark brown; the tarsi are whitish, with darker marks at the tarsal joints. The rear legs are pale, with varying amounts of brown dusting and blotching.
Wingspan: 12–14 mm.
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The larvae initially mine the epidermis on the underside of the leaf and create fairly long tracks that often follow the midrib. The mine track eventually turns towards the leaf margin and expands into a tentiform blotch that is < 1 cm across. The larvae eventually leave the tentiform blotches and create feeding shelters. The shelter may consists of either a simple leaf fold when feeding on poplars, or a leaf roll when feeding on willows with narrower leaves. The folds and leaf rolls can be made on either surface of the leaf. The final instar produces a shiny cocoon on the underside of the leaf (Eiseman, 2019).
Larvae ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos, especially where associated with known host plants.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Caloptilia stigmatella is widely distributed in the Holarctic Region, including most of Europe, and eastern and western North America. In eastern North America, it occurs throughout much of southeastern Canada and the eastern US, with populations becoming more scattered towards the southern areas of the range. This species appears to occur statewide in North Carolina.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: Our records extend from late May through October, with a peak in activity during the summer months.
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Populations are general found in settings that support either poplars or willows. These include alluvial floodplains, the sunny margins of bogs, ponds, lakes, and swamps, and wet thickets, ditches, and other hydric habitats.
Larval Host Plants: The larvae feed on species of poplar (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.), including our native Eastern Cottonwood (P. deltoides) and Black Willow (Salix nigra), along with introduced species such as White Poplar (P. alba). Swamp Cottonwood (P. heterophylla) is a likely candidate, but the use of this species as a host has not been verified to date.
Observation Methods: This species is attracted to lights and local populations can be documented by raising adults from leaf folds and rolls.
Wikipedia
See also Habitat Account for Shoreline Shrublands
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: GNR S3S4
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
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 Photo Gallery for Caloptilia stigmatella - No common name

Photos: 13

Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2020-03-28
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2020-01-19
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2019-10-13
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: Vin Stanton on 2019-08-29
Buncombe Co.
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Recorded by: Mark Shields on 2019-06-06
Onslow Co.
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Recorded by: Jim Petranka and Becky Elkin on 2018-09-05
Madison Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf on 2016-06-28
Yancey Co.
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Recorded by: Britta Muiznieks on 2014-05-23
Dare Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf on 2013-08-29
Warren Co.
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Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2013-08-12
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Tom Sanders on 2012-06-21
Mecklenburg Co.
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Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2012-05-07
Wake Co.
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Recorded by: Harry Wilson on 2011-06-30
Wake Co.
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