Moths of North Carolina
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View PDFNoctuidae Members: 45 NC Records

Eueretagrotis perattentus (Grote, 1876) - Two-spot Dart Moth



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Taxonomy
Family: Noctuidae Subfamily: Noctuinae Tribe: Noctuini P3 Number: 933569.00 MONA Number: 11008.00                                                                                  
Comments: This genus contains 3 northern New World species that come down the Appalachian Mountains into North Carolina.
Species Status: Specimens from North Carolina have been sequenced and match almost all of those from more northern localities, there is one outlying specimen from Canada which may signify a sibling species in that part of the range.
Identification
Field Guide Descriptions: Covell (1984); Beadle and Leckie (2012)Online Photographs: MPG, BugGuideTechnical Description, Adults: Forbes (1954); Lafontaine (1998)                                                                                  
Adult Markings: Specimens are usually easy to place to genus. This is the easiest species to identify because of the dark contrast between the dark forewing (particularly between the orbicular and reniform spots) and the light hindwing.
Adult Structural Features: There is no spining on the tibia. For males this is the easiest species to distinguish because there is a pointed bulge in the middle of the ventral valve edge. The cornutus in the vesica is elongated and pointed backward. In the female the lateral edges of the ostium are enlarged, semicircular and well sclerotized, breast-like.
Structural photos
Adult ID Requirements: Identifiable from good quality photos of unworn specimens.
Immatures and Development: The young larvae probably overwinter.
Distribution in North Carolina
Distribution: Restricted to the Mountains in North Carolina.
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Flight Dates:
 High Mountains (HM) ≥ 4,000 ft.
 Low Mountains (LM) < 4,000 ft.
 Piedmont (Pd)
 Coastal Plain (CP)

Click on graph to enlarge
Flight Comments: There appears to be but a single brood with adults on the wing in June, July and into August at the higher elevations.
Habitats and Life History
Habitat account for General High Elevation Forests
Habitats: Our records come primarily from Northern Hardwood and Spruce-fir Forests above 3200’, but we also have a few records from Cove Forests at lower elevations.
Larval Host Plants: Although captive larvae feed on blueberry, pin cherry, and elderberry, no larvae were found during the Canadian Forest Surveys indicating they are probably on low growing forbs.
Observation Methods: Adults come readily to light but we could not find information regarding their attraction to bait or flowers.
Status in North Carolina
Natural Heritage Program Status:
Natural Heritage Program Ranks: G5 [S3S4]
State Protection: Has no legal protection, although permits are required to collect it on state parks and other public lands.
Comments: This species appears to be a specialist on mesic montane forests and may, thus, be at some risk due to the effects of climate change. More needs to be known about its distribution, habitats, and host plants before its conservation status can be accurately determined.

 Photo Gallery for Eueretagrotis perattentus - Two-spot Dart Moth

Photos: 7

Recorded by: Ed Corey on 2016-06-29
Yancey Co.
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Recorded by: Ed Corey on 2016-06-29
Yancey Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf, K. Kittelberger on 2015-06-18
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf, K. Kittelberger on 2015-06-18
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf,B. Bockhahn, K. Kittelberger on 2015-06-17
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: Paul Scharf,B. Bockhahn, K. Kittelberger on 2014-06-08
Avery Co.
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Recorded by: Doug Blatny/Jackie Nelson on 2012-08-06
Ashe Co.
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