Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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APHROPHORIDAE Members: NC Records

Aphrophora cribrata - Pine Spittlebug



© Kyle Kittelberger- Pine Spittlebugs mating,
side view

© Ken Childs- side view

© Paul Scharf- nymph
Taxonomy
Family: APHROPHORIDAE
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: The Pine Spittlebug has the most inflated face of any spittlebug, sticking out in front of the flat upper surface ("crown") of the head; this gives the spittlebug's face a swollen appearance and a pointed head, distinctive to this species and a useful characteristic to separate A. cribrata from other members of this genus which have rounded heads. In addition, the black and white wing pattern/markings are distinctive; the white marks are spotted in appearance and form a disjunct upside down "V" with an apex facing the head. Wings are heavily pitted, characteristic of members of this genus. Males are typically smaller than females, ranging from 8.8 to 10 mm, while females are 9.1-11.5 mm. BG
Nymphs are dark, with a dark head and thorax and a pale brown abdomen. Nymphs show the pronounced jutting head characteristic of adults.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Found throughout the eastern United States, south to Georgia, and north into Canada to Saskatchewan. BG
Abundance: Locally abundant in white pine woods, likely more abundant and widespread in pine forests.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Locally abundant in white pine woods. BG
Plant Associates: Pines (Pinus sp.), including Scots pine (P. sylvestris), Pitch pine (P. rigida) and White pine (O. strobus); also introduced Norway spruce (Picea abies). The feeding punctures of this species are frequently invaded by Scotch pine blight or sooty mold, typically leading to tree mortality. Native trees are more resistant to damage from this spittlebug than introduced tree species. (Hamilton, 1982)
Behavior:
Comment: As the name suggests, this species creates spittle around the young. This spittle can be found among the needles of white pine.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Aphrophora cribrata Pine Spittlebug

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Halifax Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat; a mating pair
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted To Black Light
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Bockhahn, Scharf
Burke Co.
Comment: LAJA - 2014 BioBlitz, NYMPH, Found in Spittle on Pine Tree
Photo by: Bockhahn, Scharf
Burke Co.
Comment: LAJA - 2014 BioBlitz, NYMPH, Found in Spittle on Pine Tree
Photo by: L. Amos
Warren Co.
Comment:
Photo by: F. Williams
Gates Co.
Comment:
Photo by: T. DeSantis
Camden Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Harry Wilson
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood and pine habitat
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: