Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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   Sole representative of CERCOPIDAE in NC
NC Records

Prosapia bicincta - Two-lined Spittlebug



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Ken Childs- top view

© Woodworker- 'probable' black form
Taxonomy
Family: CERCOPIDAE
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A distinctive species, adults are black with two orange lines crossing the wings and have red eyes, reddish legs, and a reddish underside. However, some adults can be completely black on top, lacking any lines across the wings: Black Form. This seems to be a feature mostly among individuals of the Northeast and other parts of the country and has only been recorded recently (probable record) once in North Carolina; very uncommon to rare form in this state. Adults are 8-10 mm in length BG. Nymphs are usually concealed in their spittle but are black with a red abdomen: Nymph.
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Widespread and abundant throughout eastern and central North America. BG
Abundance: Common and widespread across the state, recorded from the mountains to the coastal plain.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Found in a variety of habitats, ranging from mixed hardwood forests to grassy, field-type areas. A generalist species.
Plant Associates: Nymphs feed on centipedegrass, bermudagrass and other grasses, including occasionally corn. Adults feed on hollies, foraging on the underside of leaves- damage shows up as pale mottling not usually visible from above BG. This species has also been associated with Asimina, Ilex, Cucurbita, Glycine, Trifolium, and Eremochioa ophiuroides (DL).
Behavior: As the name suggests, these insects produce spittle, which the nymphs use to protect themselves. The spittle is produced from juices that the nymphs suck from the plant. Adults, if disturbed, can exude a smelly chemical defense. BG
Comment: The Two-lined Spittlebug can go through irruption years, becoming very abundant. When this happens, large numbers of the spittlebugs can be found in a single location. This species can also be attracted to black lights, mercury vapor lights, and other light sources and, if enough spittlebugs arrive, they can form large mating masses.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Prosapia bicincta Two-lined Spittlebug

Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Common during sweeps and at black light at night
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Common almost anywhere sweeping. Also attracted to Black Lights
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf, Patrick Coin
Halifax Co.
Comment: grassy area and mixed hardwood forest edge near pine forest; large number of individuals congregating, many of which formed mating masses
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf, Patrick Coin
Halifax Co.
Comment: grassy area and mixed hardwood forest edge near pine forest; large number of individuals congregating, many of which formed mating masses
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf, Patrick Coin
Halifax Co.
Comment: grassy area and mixed hardwood forest edge near pine forest; large number of individuals congregating, many of which formed mating masses
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Newman, Randy
Carteret Co.
Comment:
Photo by: E. Corey, K. Futch, J. Shimel
New Hanover Co.
Comment: CABE
Photo by:
Alleghany Co.
Comment: black form, tentative but probable ID
Photo by: Owen McConnell
Graham Co.
Comment: Attracted to cabin lights, resting on wood near lighted window
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: on back door of house.
Photo by: Tracy S. Feldman
Scotland Co.
Comment: unid_planthopper
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Weedy area near hardwood forest edge.
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: I usually see one, 6 tonight!
Photo by: Amanda Auxier
Pender Co.
Comment: Attracted to white CFL porch light in semi-wooded residential area.
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment:
Photo by: j.wyche
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: K. Bischof
Beaufort Co.
Comment: GOCR - Obs. at ranger 2\'s residence.
Photo by: K. Bischof
Beaufort Co.
Comment: GOCR - Obs. at ranger 2\'s residence.
Photo by: J. Wyche
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: J. Wyche
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: R. Preston
Chatham Co.
Comment: JORD
Photo by: J. Wyche
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: K. Bischof
Beaufort Co.
Comment: GOCR
Photo by: j.wyche
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: J. Wyche
Gates Co.
Comment: MEMI
Photo by: L. Amos
Warren Co.
Comment: KELA
Photo by: J. A. Anderson
Surry Co.
Comment: PIMO
Photo by: Hunter Phillips, Cathy Songer
Wayne Co.
Comment:
Photo by: vin stanton
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Vin Stanton
Haywood Co.
Comment: