Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Erythroneura octonotata - No Common Name



© John Rosenfeld- note color and pattern

© John Rosenfeld

© John Rosenfeld- note black areas
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A yellowish to orange species with two prominent small black spots on the middle of the wings along the commissure. There are two yellow or orange parallel submedial lines on the top of the head, with a broad white midline in between. The pronotum has a Y to M-shaped mark, sometimes with the anterior margin colored as well. Much of the scutellum is black except for the lateral triangles; this bold black scutellum is diagnostic for this species, though in some specimens the apex of the scutellum is pale. The black mesonotum sometimes is visible through the pronotum. The costal margin of the wings has a small black mark in the middle, and the wing tips are smudged with brown; there is a bold pair of black spots along the inner margin of the wings near the tips. In var. rufomaculata, the clavi of the wings is a bold, bright red. Adults are 2.6-2.9 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)

For more images of this species, see: 3I.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: A widespread species found throughout the central and eastern United States, though for some reason there has been a dearth of records from North Carolina until now (3I)
Abundance: A single record from Buncombe county in the mountains; probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Habitats and Life History
Habitats:
Plant Associates: Rubus sp., Vitis sp., Cercis canadensis, Ilex decidua, Ulmus alata, Aesculus sp. (3I)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is most similar to E. vagabunda, as both species have black spots in the middle of the wings. However, the spots tend to be much larger in E. octonotata, and there is a prominent pair of spots along the inner margin of the wings near the tips. Additionally, the middle of the scutellum is black in octonotata; vagabunda lacks this black.
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Erythroneura octonotata No Common Name

Photo by: J. Allen Ratzlaff
Buncombe Co.
Comment:
Photo by: John Rosenfeld
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: John Rosenfeld
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: John Rosenfeld
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: John Rosenfeld
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: John Rosenfeld
Out Of State Co.
Comment: