Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Idiocerus n-species - Undescribed Idiocerus Species



© Kyle Kittelberger- male; note pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- male, note black tip to
antennae

© Kyle Kittelberger- female; note pattern

© Kyle Kittelberger- female; note white stripe
down thorax
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: EurymelinaeSynonym: Idiocerus nr. albolinea
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A distinctive looking hopper, a rusty-brown yellowish color overall with black wing venation and white marks across the wings. The scutellum has a pale yellow base with two black triangles in the upper corner and a smaller black mark between them (not always present, perhaps a sexually dimorphic feature that is only present in males?); the posterior half of the scutellum may be yellow or show a white or red stripe. The pronotum is reddish-brown with a distinctive, broad longitudinal white stripe that typically ends before reaching the head. Males have a black clubbed-tip to the antennae, characteristic of male Idiocerus.

For more images of this species, see: BG.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Primarily recorded in the Southeastern United States, uncommon.
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, uncommon to rare.
Seasonal Occurrence
Jan
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy habitat near montane forest; also mixed hardwood forests.
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is likely undescribed, as it is much further south than the known range of the similar I. albolinea (found in Canada and neighboring states). Specimens at the NCSU collection labeled as I. alternatus pertain to this undescribed species, and therefore collection records of I. alternatus have been included on here for the undescribed species. A female specimen that was DNA barcoded in 2018 was determined to be highly divergent from I. apache and I. albolinea, supporting the notion that this 'species' is undescribed. "The sternal apodemes in the dissected male are clearly different from anything illustrated in [the] revision of the genus, assuming these are fully developed. The antennal discs are also different from similar species, fairly narrow and pointed at both ends. I will have to do some more research, but I haven’t found any names with type localities in the region where you’ve found this, which further suggests it is not yet named."- Joel Kitts. Male specimens are needed to fully determine if this is a new species.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Idiocerus n-species Undescribed Idiocerus Species

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy and brushy vegetation surrounded by forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy and brushy vegetation surrounded by forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn
Rockingham Co.
Comment: grassy area near mixed hardwood forest and a pond; female
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn,C. Mitchell
Durham Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Lights
Photo by: Paul Scharf, B. Bockhahn,C. Mitchell
Durham Co.
Comment: Attracted to UV Lights
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens; as I. alternatus
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: NCSU specimens; as I. alternatus
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: stayed briefly UV light - unid_leafhopper