Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Draeculacephala savannahae - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- note color

© Kyle Kittelberger

© Kyle Kittelberger- note scutellar spots

© Kyle Kittelberger- female
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Cicadellinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A tan, brownish species that has a yellowish "faded line" around the edge of the wings. The crown is marked with thin black lines and small black dots, and the scutellum has two semi-faint black triangular-shaped black spots along the anterior margin. The wing venation is pale, contrasting with the tan wings. There is a black line around the sides of the body, and the face and underside of the body are a light brown. Females have long pointed heads, while males have much shorter heads. The female pregenital sternite is moderately to strongly produced with a noticeable projection on the posterior margin. Adult males are 5.4-6.4 mm long, while females are 6.5-7.4 mm (though males may range up to 6.9 mm and females up to 7.8 mm).
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: The Coastal Plain of southeastern North Carolina south to northern Florida (Dietrich 1994)
Abundance: A couple records from the Coastal Plain, probably more abundant near the coast (though this species may be a recent arrival in the state as it was previously known as far north as South Carolina).
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Near coastal marshes
Plant Associates: Reported from a grass-vetch mixture: Eremochloa ophiuroides-Vicia sp.
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is most similar visually to D. septemguttata and could be confused with this species. However, septemguttata has 5 bold, defined black spots/triangles on the body (3 on the head, 2 on the anterior margin of the scutellum). These spots are poorly defined in savannahae, with the spots on the head largely absent and the scutellar spots not as bold, instead appearing as if they are underneath the surface of the scutellum. The lines on the scutellum and head are also not as bold as on septemguttata.
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Draeculacephala savannahae No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: marsh grass: black needlerush, spartina, etc.; female, 7.1 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: marsh grass: black needlerush, spartina, etc.; female, 7.1 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: marsh grass: black needlerush, spartina, etc.; female, 7.1 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: marsh grass: black needlerush, spartina, etc.; female, 7.1 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: marsh grass: black needlerush, spartina, etc.; female, 7.1 mm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
New Hanover Co.
Comment: marsh grass: black needlerush, spartina, etc.; female, 7.1 mm
Photo by: Amanda Auxier
Pender Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Amanda Auxier
Pender Co.
Comment: