Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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Cicadellidae Members: NC Records

Oncopsis citra - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- female (41%)

© Kyle Kittelberger- female (52%)
Taxonomy
Family: CicadellidaeSubfamily: Eurymelinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: Males are very dark overall in coloration. They have a yellow venter, tawny to ferruginous legs, and a pale yellowish face that contrasts with a bold but narrow fuscous to black transverse band between the eyes and another on the margin of the head. The pronotum is yellowish with dark speckling, the scutellum is dark. The wings are a deep brown to black with a pale spot along the commissure (inner edge of the wings) near the apex. Females come in several color forms/phases, typical of members of Oncopsis. In Phase D (52% of females), the head, pronotum, and scutellum are yellow, contrasting with ferruginous tinted wings. Phase C(0.5%) is similarly colored but has darker ferruginous markings on the wings. In the second most common form, phase B (41%), the scutellum and pronotum are a bold ferruginous color that contrasts with a yellow head; the wings are largely ferruginous with a whitish V-shaped mark in the middle [of the back] and two clear "windows" closer to the apex. In phase A (7%), the females are colored similar to brown males but have a face that is more or less ferruginous. The female pregenital sternite has a prominent to very small notch on the posterior margin. Adult males are 4.9-5.9 mm long, while females are 5.1-5.9 mm. (Hamilton 1983)

Nymphs are ferruginous with a white, pale tip to the abdomen that contrasts with the darker rusty base of the abdomen.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern United States, transcontinental in Canada
Abundance: Primarily found in the mountains where it is uncommon; a single record from the Piedmont, which seems quite out of range for this species.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Forest edge, brushy areas, places where birch trees can be found
Plant Associates: Yellow birch (B. alleghaniensis), paper birch (B. papyrifera), wire birch (B. populiforlia), water birch (B. occidentalis), other birches (Hamilton 1983)
Behavior:
Comment: This species is similar to O. sobria, but males of citra do not have the embrowned face that males of sobria have, and females of sobria lack the pale markings found on the wings of citra; female sobria are also more ferruginous overall than citra. The nymphs of citra are distinctive in coloration among members of this genus. (Hamilton 1983)
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Oncopsis citra No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen; nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen; nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen; female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen; female