Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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Cicadellidae Members: NC Records

Macrosteles lepidus - No Common Name



© Rob Van Epps- note 3 spots near eye

© Rob Van Epps- note 6 spots on head

© Rob Van Epps- female
Taxonomy
Family: CicadellidaeSubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A greenish species overall, sometimes with somewhat smoky or dark wings. There are six prominent black markings on the vertex: 2 large ones in the middle of the head (between the eyes), 2 on the vertex edge (these are tear-shaped), and 1 thin line on the side of each eye. The size and boldness of these head markings can vary among individuals. There is a small black spot in each lateral triangle of the scutellum. The female pregenital sternite has the posterior margin convexly rounded on either side of a broad but shallow median excavation. The male genital plates are short, with attenuated apexes. Adults are between 4.0 and 5.0 mm long. (DeLong 1948)

For images of this species, see: BG. For diagrams of this species, see: Zahniser.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and central North America
Abundance: Recorded from several counties in the Piedmont, uncommon to rare; probably more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Near moist or swampy woodland areas
Plant Associates:
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: This species is very similar to M. parvidens and an identification can be challenging between the two; it is therefore important for either a detailed, clear view of the head to show the markings or a nice image of the female pregenital sternite. M. lepidus has 6 prominent, bold spots on the head while M. parvidens has 4, though some parvidens can have a small black spot on the side of the head next to the eye (usually connected with a black bar on the edge of the vertex to the median spots); this additional black spot though does not extend half way along the length of the eye like in lepidus. The size of the black spots on the edge of the vertex are also typically noticeably larger in lepidus. Additionally, lepidus tends to have a head that has a shorter width between the eyes than parvidens. Finally, the female pregenital sternite is distinctive between these two species: in lepidus, there is a broad but shallow median notch and lobed posterior margins, while in parvidens there is a small triangular median notch and no lobed margins.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Macrosteles lepidus No Common Name

Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Came to UV light. Suburban yard near woods. Female
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Came to UV light. Suburban yard near woods. Female
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Came to UV light. Suburban yard near woods. Female
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Randy L Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: UV light
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4.1 mm, sweep through permanently wet marshy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4.1 mm, sweep through permanently wet marshy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4.1 mm, sweep through permanently wet marshy area
Photo by: Ken Kneidel
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: 4.1 mm, sweep through permanently wet marshy area