Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Diplocolenus configuratus - No Common Name


No image for this species.
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Deltocephalinae
Taxonomic Author: (Uhler 1878)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A grayish species mottled all over with dark marks, especially on the wings. The vertex is flat and bluntly angled, wider between the eyes than in the middle; there is a distinctive white "cross" mark on the vertex, and there is a white line on the inner sides of each eye. The pronotum has white longitudinal bands, and the wing venation is white. The face is a pale fuscous color. The female seventh sternite is black on the central half with a posterior margin concavely rounded on either side of a very prominent projection, which is usually bifid (has two teeth). The male subgenital plates have lateral lobes, strongly divering from one another. Adults are 4.0-4.5 mm long. Nymphs have a characteristic orange color pattern with white lines on the thorax, a pale midline on the abdomen, and pale abdominal sides. (DeLong 1948)

For diagrams of this species, see: Zahniser.

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: A common species, found throughout much of North America
Abundance: Recorded recently from a single county in the mountains, possibly more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Grassy, brushy habitat.
Plant Associates: Poa compressa, other grasses (DeLong 1948)
Behavior:
Comment: Until adults can be associated with nymphs, the identity of the specimens on this page is tentative.
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Diplocolenus configuratus No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm; nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm; nymph