Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Limotettix uhleri - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- female

© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- male
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: DeltocephalinaeTribe: LimotettiginiSubgenus: Scleroracus
Taxonomic Author: (Ball, 1911)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A fuscous species that varies in coloration, ranging from pale brownish to blackish; pale individuals were once treated as species/subspecies Limotettix speculata. The wings tends to have pale golden venation and inner areas of cells, and there are golden markings on the thorax and head. However, some adults are almost all black. The face is dark brown to blackish. The legs are bicolored, yellow with a black base. Adult males are around 4.0 mm long, females are 4.5-4.7 mm (McKamey 2001).
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Distribution: Eastern and Central North America. Previously known as far south as the District of Columbia.
Abundance: Recorded recently from the mountains, possibly more abundant in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in grassy, brushy areas including fields and roadsides.
Plant Associates: Asteraceae (McKamey 2001)
Behavior:
Comment: The only species that have the legs divided into yellow and black halves like this are L. anthracinus (body all black), L.vaccinii, L. cachcolus, L. uhleri, L. kryptus and L. osborni (more slender). (McKamey 2001)

The external features of L. uhleri closely resemble those of L. kryptus, with both species sharing a broadly overlapping geographic distribution. However, females of uhleri have a more angulate head and are a little larger than kryptus females. (McKamey 2001) Additionally, the pregenital sternites of the two species are different per Beirne (1956). In kryptus, the sternite is distinctly trilobed with a sinusoidal posterior margin; there also appear to be two pale spots on the anterior margin, with the rest of the sternite dark. In uhleri, the sternite is wider [than in kryptus] and largely blackish, and is more bilobed than trilobed with a gradual median projection that doesn't quite extend out as far as the pointed lateral margins of the sternite.

Status: Native
Global and State Rank:

Species Photo Gallery for Limotettix uhleri No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy area on mixed forest edge; female, possibly this species
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy area on mixed forest edge; female, possibly this species
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Watauga Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy area on mixed forest edge; female, possibly this species
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy, brushy field-type habitat in old christmas tree farm
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Swain Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/52211889
Photo by: Margarita Lankford
Swain Co.
Comment: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/52211889