Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Oncopsis sobria - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- male

© Kyle Kittelberger- dark female

© Kyle Kittelberger- dark brown female

© Kyle Kittelberger- ferruginous female
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Eurymelinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: Males are dark, with wings ranging in color from a dark brown to jet black; these black winged individuals have a vivid violet sheen. The venter is tawny, sometimes with pale yellow on the face; the legs are yellowish. In brown-winged individuals, the pronotum and scutellum are a similarly colored dark brown speckled with fuscous markings. In black-winged inidividuals, the pronotum, scutellum, and head are reddish. Females typically are a rusty brown to orange color overall, with the wings the same color as the body. Some females though can have darker wings and resemble the males; these females have a yellowish pronotum and head that contrasts with a dark reddish scutellum. The venter is a bright yellow, and the face is either yellow or ferruginous. The female pregenital sternite has a shallow to truncate notch on the posterior margin. Adult males are around 4.5-5.5 mm long, while females are 4.8-5.8 mm. (Hamilton 1983)

Nymphs tend to be completely ferruginous or brown. Some are occasionally maculate with yellow and/or fuscous coloration. (Hamilton 1983)

Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern North America, ranging from the Northeast and southeastern Canada south into the Appalachians, at least as far south as North Carolina; also found in the Midwest, western Canada, and the Pacific Northwest.
Abundance: Primarily found in the mountains where it is uncommon, probably more abundant in that region in the right habitat. Also recorded from the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, which seems quite out of range for this species.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in brushy, shrubby vegetation near fields and roadsides.
Plant Associates: Paper birch (Betula papyrifera), yellow birch (B. alleghaniensis), wire birch (B. populiforlia), water birch (B. occidentalis) (Hamilton 1983)
Behavior:
Comment:
Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Oncopsis sobria No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Mitchell Co.
Comment: brushy, shrubby vegetation in a montane "field"
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Mitchell Co.
Comment: brushy, shrubby vegetation in a montane "field"
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Mitchell Co.
Comment: brushy, shrubby vegetation in a montane "field"
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: open area near mixed hardwood forest
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: female
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Out Of State Co.
Comment: NCSU specimen; nymph
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy and brushy vegetation surrounded by forest; male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy and brushy vegetation surrounded by forest; male
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger, Brian Bockhahn, Paul Scharf
Avery Co.
Comment: grassy and brushy vegetation surrounded by forest; male