Hoppers of North Carolina:
Spittlebugs, Leafhoppers, Treehoppers, and Planthoppers
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MEMBRACIDAE Members: NC Records

Archasia auriculata - No Common Name



© Ken Childs

© Matthew S. Wallace
Taxonomy
Family: MEMBRACIDAESubfamily: SmiliinaeTribe: Telamonini
Taxonomic Author: (Fitch, 1851)
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A green species with a very high and rounded pronotum (typically more so than A. belfragei) that is strongly foliaceous, covered with dense pale speckling. The dorsal crest overhangs the head, and the brownish edge to the crest is broken by scattered pale spots, both features characteristic of this species. The head is smooth and sparingly pubescent, while the pronotum is closely but distinctly punctate and sparsely pubescent. The tegmina is smoky hyaline with darker tips, contrasting with the green pronotum. The underside and legs are a yellowish-brown. Adults are 9- 11 mm long and 4.5-5.0 mm wide with a 6 mm high pronotum. (Kopp & Yonke, 1974)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Eastern, central, and southwestern North America
Abundance: Scattered records across the state, very uncommon. Seasonal distribution: 9 May-27 August (CTNC)
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats:
Plant Associates: Water oak (Quercus nigra), black oak (Q. velutina) (CTNC); northern pin oak, blackjack oak, chinquapin oak, pin oak (Kopp & Yonke, 1974); also white oak (Q. alba). Adults have additionally been associated with Castanea dentata (American chestnut), Carya (hickory), Eupatorium (thoroughwart), Q. chapmanii (Chapman oak), Q. falcata (southern red oak), Q. gambelii (Gambel oak), Q. ilicifolia (bear or scrub oak), Q. macrocarpa (bur oak), Q. rubra (northern red oak), Q. stellata (post oak), and Verbena hastata (swamp verbena) (Wallace 2014)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment:
Status: Native
Global and State Rank:
See also Habitat Account for General Oak-Hickory Forests

Species Photo Gallery for Archasia auriculata No Common Name

Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment: