Hoppers of North Carolina:
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CICADELLIDAE Members: NC Records

Erythroneura rubra - No Common Name



© Kyle Kittelberger- side view

© Kyle Kittelberger- note pale midline on head

© Kyle Kittelberger- note coloration

© Ken Childs- note pattern
Taxonomy
Family: CICADELLIDAESubfamily: Typhlocybinae
Identification
Online Photographs: BugGuide                                                                                  
Description: A boldly marked species with a strongly developed red-blue color pattern on the wings and body. The top of the head has two reddish orange parallel submedial lines, with a pale midline between (characteristic of this species); the submedial lines are typically broad and bold, somewhat "L" shaped. The pronotum has a "Y" or "V" shaped reddish mark in the middle and a red bar on the lateral margins; the rest of the pronotum is pale blue. The mesonotum is mostly dark red. The underside of the thorax is dark, and the anteclypeus is typically pale, concolorous with the face. The wings have a dark orange to red color pattern that contrasts with a pale blue base. There are three blue marks near the middle of the wings whose outline resembles that of an arrow. The wing tips are dark. Adults are 2.9-3.1 mm long. (Dmitriev & Dietrich, 2007)
Distribution in North Carolina
County Map: Clicking on a county returns the records for the species in that county.
Out of State Record(s)
Distribution: Central and eastern United States (3I)
Abundance: Recorded across the state, primarily in the Piedmont where it can be locally common; probably more abundant across the state in the right habitat.
Seasonal Occurrence
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Habitats and Life History
Habitats: Has been found in mixed hardwood forest.
Plant Associates: Vitis spp., Rubus sp., Ilex decidua, among others (3I)
Behavior: Can be attracted at night with a light.
Comment: There are three species of Erythroneura that feed on dogwood and are very similar in appearance; this includes E. rubrella which is a vibrant red color, E. corni which has extensive red markings on the head (compared to E. rubrella, which has limited, less bold markings and has a brighter red color pattern), and E. ontari which has a less vibrant and bold color pattern. E. rubra, which feeds on grapes (Vitis sp.), is also very similar in appearance to E. rubrella and E. corni, though it has a pale midline on the top of the head.

E. rubra though is most similar to E. festiva, a species which has not yet been recorded in North Carolina but should occur here. Both species have very similar color patterns with slight differences. Size wise, E. rubra is slight larger; E. rubra is 2.9- 3.1 mm long, whereas E. festiva is 2.6-2.7 mm. Additionally, in festiva the head markings are more extensive with a noticeable lateral branch off of the submedial lines; this lateral branch encapsulates a prominent white circle near the eyes. In rubra, the lateral branch is either lacking or not very well defined, and the submedial lines tend to be much broader and bolder. The antyclypeus of festiva is brown, while in rubra it is typically pale, concolorous with the rest of the face. Finally, in rubra the red coloration on the wings is more extensive, with smaller pale bluish spots, especially the three near the middle of the back; in festiva, these bluish spots are larger and block-shaped. For more pics of E. festiva, see: BG.

Dark individuals of E. reflecta could also be confused with E. rubra. However, note differences in color and pattern: in reflecta, the dark red color pattern contrasts with bold white patches whereas in rubra the lighter red color pattern contrasts with pale blue patches.

Due to variation among individuals, as well as the similarity between these species, in some situations a species level identification may not be possible, or be a best guess at most.

Status: Native

Species Photo Gallery for Erythroneura rubra No Common Name

Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat; an individual with a fused midline
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat; an individual with a fused midline
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Caught sweeping
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf
Warren Co.
Comment: Attracted to Light
Photo by: Paul Scharf, Brian Bockhahn
Burke Co.
Comment: Attracted to Black Light
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Kyle Kittelberger
Wake Co.
Comment: mixed hardwood forest habitat
Photo by: Rob Van Epps
Mecklenburg Co.
Comment: Attracted to black light in woods.
Photo by: R Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: moth sheet - unid_leafhopper
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: Ken Childs
Out Of State Co.
Comment:
Photo by: B. Bockhahn, P. Scharf, L. Amos
Warren Co.
Comment: KELA
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights
Photo by: Randy Emmitt
Orange Co.
Comment: uv lights